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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Ossipee, New Hampshire"

TOWN OF OSSIPEE 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 




ANNUAL REPORT 
1995 



PHONE LISTINGS 

Ambulance/Fire/Rescue 911 

CAP (Community Action Program) 539-4165 

Courts 

Ossipee District Court 539-4561 

Probate Court 539-4123 

Superior Court 539-2201 

OCC (Ossipee Concerned Citizens) 539-6851 

Police Department 

Ossipee 539-2011 

Sheriff's Department 539-2284 

Schools 

Superintendent of Schools 569-1 658 

Ossipee Elementary 539-4589 

Effingham Elementary 539-6032 

Kingswood Junior High 569-3689 

Kingswood High 569-2055 

For additional phone 

listings and office hours 

please see inside 

back cover 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



of the Town Officers 



OSSIPEE 

New Hampshsire 





Tax Rates 






$21.74 


per $1,000.00 




Unit of Government 


Rate 


Unit of Government 


Rate 


Municipal 


4.07 


Ctr. Ossipee 


1.35 


County 


.85 


West Ossipee 


1.24 


School 


16.82 


Ossipee Corner 


1.49 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 

December 31, 1995 

Vital Statistics for 1 995 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Town Officers 4 

Minutes of 1995 Town Meeting 6 

Warrant 17 

Budget 25 

Auditors' Report 33 

Tax Collector's Report 35 

Inventory of Valuations 37 

Statement of Appropriations 39 

Town Clerk's Report 41 

Treasurer's Report 42 

Selectmen's Report 43 

Trust Funds Report 53 

Library Report 56 

Selectmen's Yearly Review 62 

Police Department Report 64 

Rescue Squad Report 66 

Timber Conservation Report 67 

Executive Councilor's Report 69 

Tri-County Community Action 71 

Historical Society Report 72 

Planning Board Report 74 

Zoning Board of Adjustment Report 75 

Code Officer's Report 76 

LRPC Assistance Report 17 

Ossipee Conservation Commission Report 79 

Old Home Week 80 

Recreation Director's Report 81 

Ossipee Lake Dam Authority Report 83 

Animal Control Report 85 

Community Nurse 86 

Ossipee Concerned Citizens 87 

Welfare Report 88 

Ossipee Water and Wastewater Department 89 

Fire Warden's Reports 92 

Ossipee Corner Fire Department Report 93 

Center Ossipee Fire Precinct Budget 97 

Vital Statistics 98 




Dedicated to 
THOMAS L. GALANTE 



Thomas Galante is a dedicated man. In 1950 Tom married his childhood 
sweetheart; Mary, and they are celebrating their 45th anniversary this year. After a 
stint in the Air Force, Tom worked as a school teacher in Medford, Massachusetts, 
teaching machine shop and mathematics. He was there for 25 years and retired to 
Ossipee in 1978. 

He retired from one profession and dedicated himself to the Town of 
Ossipee. That year Tom became the Tax Collector, and In 1979 he was elected as 
Town Treasurer. The job has become more complex since that time, and Tom has 
kept pace. Remember, the school payment was just under $800,000, and the total 
budget was $1.5 million when Tom took office. Today the school payment runs 
$4.2 million, and the total budget tops $6.6 million. Tom takes it all in stride. 
Today, some 18 years and 55 Selectmen later, Tom Is dedicated to taking his job 
seriously and to being a good citizen of this town. 

The Town of Ossipee is lucky to have good, dedicated citizens like 
Tom — people who go the extra mile and truly have the best interests of the Town 
at heart. We sincerely thank you, Tom, for the many years of service to the Town 
and to the many more ahead. 



TOWN OFFICERS 



ELECTED OFFICERS 

Joseph G. Skehan, Jr. 
Patricia Jones 
Sandra Putnam-Martin 

Barbara R. Adams 

Thomas R. Gaydos 

Donald W. Meader 

Thomas Galante 

George Lynch 
June Loud 
Joan Bishop 

Ernest Baker 
Phyllis "Nan" Egan 
Phyllis J. Hatch 

Mary Buswell 
Eileen Leavitt 
Catherine D, Ziegler 
Elizabeth Rouner 
Susan Day 



Selectmen: 3 year term 



Town Clerk/Tax Collector 



Town Administrator 



Moderator 



Treasurer 



Trustees of Trust Funds 



EXPIRATION DATE 

03/96 
03/97 
03/98 

03/98 



Cemetery Trustees 



Library Trustees 



Budget Committee 



Belinda Cullen, Chairman 

Mark Wright 

John Swanson 

Wendell S. Thompson 

Stanley Brothers 

Keith Brown 

Bert Pendarvis, Ossipee Corner Light & Power 

Joseph Goss, West Ossipee Fire Precinct 

Scott Brown, Center Ossipee Fire Precinct 

Supervisor of the Checklist: 6 year term 
Priscilla Nudd 



03/96 

03/97 

03/97 
03/96 
03/98 

03/96 
03/96 
03/96 

03/96 
03/97 
03/98 
03/96 
03/97 

03/98 
03/97 
03/96 
03/97 
03/98 
03/96 



03/2002 



Laurence Brownell 03/96 

Frances Pinkham 03/98 

APPOl NTED B Y SELECTMEN 

Chief of Police 

Richard Morgan 
Water & Sewer Department 

Roland C. Stockbridge, Supt. 

Recreation Department 

Peter Waugh, Director 

Community Nurse 

Visiting Nurse Association of 

Wolfeboro and Vicinity, Inc. 

Sandra Montgomery 

Forest Fire Warden 

Dana B. Cullen 

Dog Warden 

James Elcock 

Librarian 

Lindalee Lambert 

Board of Health 

Thomas R. Gaydos, Administrator 

Planning Board 

Gilbert Adams, Chairman 03/98 James Rines 03/96 

E. Milton Dow 03/98 George Lynch 03/96 

Boyd Parker 03/97 John Swanson 03/97 

Warren Harrington 03/98 Ray Leavitt, Secretary 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 
Mark. McConkey, Chairman 03/96 Eleanor Prudholme, Secretary 

Stanley Brothers 
James F. McKinnon Jr. 
David L. Babson Jr. 

Peter OIkkola, Chairman 
Frank Hammond 
Maria LaGuardIa 
Ray Leavitt, Secretary 



03/98 Joseph Deighan 


03/96 


03/97 Sandra P. Martin 


03/96 


03/96 Paul WIckwire 


03/96 


Conservation Commission 




03/97 Ralph Buchanan 


03/96 


03/97 James F. Rines 


03/96 


John Smith 


03/98 


L. Randy Lyman 




Conservation Agent 




John Smith 




Codes Enforcement 




Maurice O'Donnell 





TOWN OF OSSIPEE 
Town Meeting - March 14, 1995 

To the inhabitants of the Town of Ossipee in the County of Carroll, in the State of 
New Hampshire, qualified to vote in Town Affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Town Hall in Center Ossipee, in said Town of 
Ossipee on the second Tuesday in March next, being the l4th day of March, 1995 at 10 
o'clock in the forenoon (10:00 A.M.) of said day. 

To act on the Articles, the polls to remain open until six thirty o-clock in the evening 
(6:30 P.M.) of said day. 

ARTICLE 1 : To elect all necessary Town Officers for the ensuing year as follows: to choose 
one (1) Selectman for a term of three (3) years; one (1) Town Clerk/Tax Collector for a term 
of three (3) years; one (1) Trustee of Trust Funds for a term of three (3) years; One (1) 
Cemetery Trustee for a term of two (2) years; one (1) Cemetery Trustee for a term of one (1) 
year; two (2) Budget Committee Members for a term of three (3) years; one (1) Library 
Trustee for a term of three (3) years; two (2) Planning Board Members for a term of three 
(3) years; nvo (2) Planning Board Members for a term of two (2) years; two Planning Board 
Members for a term of one (1) year; and one (1) Zoning Board Member for a term of three 
(3) years. 

MINUTES 
The polls opened at 10:00 AM. 

Moderator Donald Mealier led the Pledge of Allegiance. 
Rev. Ray Leavitt gave the invocation. 
The Moderator displayed the empty ballot box and reviewed the rules. 

Article 1 Vote: 

Selectman 3 Yrs Sandra P. Martin 

Town Clerk/Tax Collector 3 Yrs Barbara R. Adams 

Cemetery Trusteed Yrs Alice A. Baker 

Cemetery Trustee 2 Yrs Ann Marie Kuell 

Cemetery Trustee 1 Yr Phyllis W. Egan 

Library Trustee 3 Yrs Catherine D. Ziegltr 

Trustee of Trust Funds 3 Yrs Joan E. Bishop 

Budget Committee 3 Yrs Belinda W. Cullen 

Budget Committee 3 Yrs Veronica L. Rogers 

Planning Board 3 Yrs Gilbert C. Adams Jr. 

Planning Board 3 Yrs Ellis Milton Dow 

Planning Board 2 Yrs Boyd H. Parker 

Planning Board 2 Yrs .John H. Swanson 

Planning Board 1 Yr George F. Lynch 

Planning Board 1 Yr James F. Rines 

Zoning Board 3 Yrs Stanley N. Brothers 

ARTICLE 2: Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment Number 1 for the Town 

Zoning Ordinance as follows: 

(Providing the affected lots meet State Water and Sewer requirements): 

To modify the existing Rural lot size from (3) acres, 400 foot frontage, 20% lot 
coverage to: (1) acre, 200 foot frontage, 25% coverage. 

To modify the existing Roadside Commercial lot from (3) acres, 400 foot frontage, 



side setback of 75 feet, rear setback of 50 feet to: (1) acre, 200 foot frontage, side setback of 
50 feet, and rear setback of 25 feet. 

(Intent of the Anicle: This Amendment will modify lot sizes and setbacks in the Rural 
and Roadside Commercial Districts.) (Submitted by Petition) (Approved by the Planning 
Board) 
Article 2 Passed. YES 464. NO 314 

ARTICLE 3: Are you in fevor of the adoption of Amendment Number 2, proposed by the 
Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as follows: (The adoption of this Article is 
required by FEMA to be accomplished prior to July 3, 1995 or Ossipee, NH will be 
suspended from participation in the NFIP and subject to the prohibitions contained in 
Section 202(a) of the Act as Amended.) Amends Article IV, General provisions, 4.10 
FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE by adding to the first paragraph the 
following: 

"Federal Emergency Management Agency Standards part 60 - Criteria for Land 
Management and Use and any additional requirements of Section 60.3(d) are hereby 

incorporated into this ordinance. Revised Maps and base (100 year) flood elevations are 
effective on July 3, 1995." 
Article 3 Passed. YES 466, NO 201 

ARTICLE 4: Are you in favor of adoption of Amendment Number 3: "To see if the Town 
will vote to amend the existing Zoning Ordinance and the Official Zoning Map by changing 
Tax Map 24, Lot 15 and a portion of Tax Map 24, Lot 43 from Rural to Commercial. The 
area to be rezoned is described as follows: 

Beginning at the Ossipee/Wakefield Town Line and at the Easterly sideline of New 
Hampshire Route 1 6; 

Thence Northerly along the sidline of NH Route 16 until it intersects the 
Southeasterly corner of Tax Map 24, Lot 42; 

Thence Southeasterly, Easterly, and Northeasterly along Tax Map 24, Lot 42 a 
distance of approximately 2937 feet to a lot corner; 

Thence Southeasterly through Tax Map 24, Lot 43 a distance of approximately 3650 
feet to the Wakefield Town Line: 

Thence Southwesterly along the Town Line a distnace of 2975 feet to the place of 
beginning." 

(Submitted by Petition) (Approved by the Planning Board) 
Article 4 Passed YES 423, NO 296 

ARTICLE 5. Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment Number 4 proposed by the 
Selectmen's Office for the Town Zoning Ordinance as follows: Amends Article XXIV, 
Section 24.1 Administration by adding Section 24.1.1 as follows: "Building and Zoning 
Permits - No construction of more than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) can begin until a 
Building and/or Zoning Permit has been issued by the Town of Ossipee, NH. Applications 
for these purposes are available at the Town Hall. The application fee will be twenty-five 
dollars ($25.00)." (The adoption of this article will assist property owners in avoiding 
inadvertent Zoning violations) (Approved by the Planning Board) 
Article 5 Passed YES 367, NO 357 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town is in favor of increasing the Board of Selectmen to five (5) 
memebers. (Submitted by Petition) 
Article 6 Defeated YES 312, NO 400 



ARTICLE 7. Do you approve of having two (2) sessions for the annual Town Meeting in 
this Town, the first session for choice of Town Officers elected by an Official Ballot and 
other action required to be inserted on said Official Ballot and the second session, on a date 
set by the Selectmen, for transaction of other business? (Submitted by Petition) 
ArticU 7 Passed. YES 374, NO 333 

The Moderator declared the polls closed at 6:30 PM 

You are also notified to meet at the Town Hall on the second Tuesday of March next, being 
the l4th day of March, at seven o'clock in the evening (7:00 P.M.) to act on the following 
articles: 

Between 6:30 PM and 7:00 PM the voters entered the hall, were verified on the voter check list 
and given a packet which included a 1995 Voter Card, list of Moderator Rules, and a packet of 
voter tickets for use if we chose a secret ballot during the evening meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 PM by the Moderator. 

The Flag was presented by Cub Scout Troop 234. 

Rev. William Shafer gave the invocation. 

Moderator Donald Meader thanked Leon Taylor, former Moderator; Barbara Adams, Town 

Clerk; Martha Eldridge, Selectmen 's Office; and Ernie Hayfordfor their support in preparing for 

this meeting. 

The moderator read the rules we will abode by for the meeting (see attached list) and explained 

the evening's proceeding. He introduced the Selectmen, Joseph Skehan, Pat Jones, Administrator 

Tom Gaydos and Town Clerk Barbara Adams. Following this he introduced the Chairman of the 

Budget Committee, Mark Wright, and Mark introduced the members of the Budget Committee. 

Six Ballot Clerks and the Deputy Clerk were dismissed to the Town Clerk's office to begin 

counting the ballots, under the supervision of the Assistant Moderator, Ray Leavitt. 

Selectman Joe Skehan welcomed the citizens to the 1995 Annual Meeting He emphasized the 

willingness of the selectmen to hear and act on the will of the people. He stated that this is where 

the selectmen will look to for the needs of the community. They have a lot of new things coming up 

and some hard decisions, but they will keep the wishes of the people foremost. 

Dave Babson made a motion that was seconded to not take up new articles after 11 PM. A hand 

count passed this motion. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of forty-eight 
thousand dollars ($48,000.00) to purchase a new rescue vehicle, said sum to be in addition 
to any federal, state or private funds made available therefor, and to authorize the withdrawal 
of all funds from the Rescue Vehicle Capital Reserve Fund created for this purpose, 
estimated to be thirty-two thousand dollars ($32,000.00) plus interest to date of withdrawal. 
(Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget Committee) (Majority 
Vote Required) 
Article 8 Passed as read. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of two hundred 
fifty-six thousand dollars ($256,000.00) to RECONSTRUCT BRIDGE NO. 124/163 
TUFTONBORO ROAD AT OUTLET OF GARLAND POND AND NO. 154/195 
TUFTONBORO ROAD OVER BEECH RIVER, a.k.a. MINNIE WHITE MEMORLU 
BRIDGE, provided the Town receives from the State, project funding approval with 80% of 



8 



the project cost to be reimbursed by the State. (Recommended by the Selectmen) 
(Recommended by the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 
ArticU 9 Passed as read. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to accept bids for the 
provision of ambulance services to the town, and to raise and appropriate the sum of sixty 
thousand dollars ($60,000.00) for this purpose. (Recommended by the Selectmen) 
(Recommended by the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 
ArticU 10 Passed as read. 

ARTICLE 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of forty 
thousand dollars ($40,000.00) for use with Block Grant money to pave Elm Street in its 
entirety. Said sum to be expended only if what is earmarked for the project is insufficient, 
and any portion unused is to be returned to the taxpayers. (Submitted by Petition) 
(Recommended by the Selectmen) (Not Recommended by the Budget Committee) 
(Majority Vote Required) 

Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. Joe Skehan asked a petitioner to speak on this 
article. Bridget Perry said that this issue has been ongoing for ten years. A 1979 study has been 
completed and paid for to substantiate this need and its priority. Jack Fogarty questioned the way 
this article was written and felt it needed to be amended or it would read that this money would 
be only for this one road. This was the reason the Budget Committee did not support it. Our 
Moderator was not quite agreeing with this interpretation but felt we could amend it to make it 
clear. 

James Rines moved to insert "use portion of the block grant money" after the $40,000. Motion 
seconded. 

Discussion continued. James Kazolias wanted to be reassured that this money would not be 
diverted to other projects. The selectmen responded by saying only emergency conditions could 
divert this such as major washouts on other roads.. 

Glen Mason asked what the Selectmen 's intentions were if we should defeat this article. Again the 
Selectmen reassured the people that Elm Street was the #1 priority for this board. Dave Williams 
questioned what happened to the priorities of Moultonville Road? What money was diverted? 
James Rines withdrew his motion and moved to amend Article 11 to read as follows: To insert 
"To be used in addition to that portion of the dedicated Block Grant Money" after the $40,000. 
Motion seconded. James McKinnon said he believes we may be hindering the selectmen. 
Joe Goss and Kathy Rouse spoke in favor of this article as amended. 
Article 11 Passed as Amended. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of twenty 
thousand dollars ($20,000.00) for capital improvements and repairs to the town hall to 
render it accessible to physically challenged individuals in compliance with the American 
with Disabilities Act. (Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget 
Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 
Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Selectman Skehan explained we have been setting money aside for this project and it will not 
increase the budget. Leon Taylor was most pleased with the article as he had been concerned about 
the conditions the handicapped individuals must deal with. Johanna Light asked a few questions 
about the money set aside last year and Joe explained. The Administrator confirmed that if 
approved the money will be spent as the article states. Rick Cogswell questioned OCC roof repairs 
when they were to be paying for their own maintenance. The Selectmen felt this was not 
considered regular maintenance. Vote to cease discussion passed. 
Article 12 Passed as read. 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to establish a Capital Reserve Fund under the 
provisions of RSA 35:1 for the purpose of repairing State-owned roadways within the town 
under a two for one matching State aid program and to raise and appropriate the sum of 
twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) to be placed in this fund and to designate the 
Selectmen as agents to expend. (Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by the 
Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 
Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Joe Skehan mentioned he attended monthly meetings last year and he became aware of State Aid 
available. It was suggested that if we wanted to see some of our State roads cared for we could put 
up $25,000 and the State would put up $50,000. They will study the roads, do the engineering 
and help maintain with State aid. First we must pass this article and when we have enough 
money, they will begin. Johanna Light asked who will contract the work and it was stated that the 
State will do the bidding and award the contracts. 
Article 13 Passed as read. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into a lease 

agreement for the purpose of leasing three (3) police cruisers, and to raise and appropriate 

the sum of nineteen thousand seven hundred eighty-five dollars ($19,785.00) for that 

purpose. (Recommended by the Selectmen) ( Recommended by the Budget Committee) 

(Majority Vote Required) 

Motion seconded and opened for discussion. 

Joe Skehan explained this was a housekeeping article. Because this is a leased vehicle which will be 

leased for more than one year we must come back each year to approve. When we come to the 

main budget, if this is passed, this amount will be removed. Rick Morgan, Police Chief, assured 

the people that this is not for another new cruiser. 

Article 14 Passed as read. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of one million 

nine hundred nineteen thousand eight hundred eighty-three dollars ($1,919,883.00) for 

general municipal operations? (Recommended by the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote 

Required) 

Moderator explained we will read and discuss line by line and vote in its entirety at end. Motion 

rruuU, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Board of Selectmen $9,200.00 

James Kazolias asked how we can vote on this until we find out how many Selectmen we will 
have based on today's vote on Article 6. We should have results prior to close of meeting 
Tom Galante read a statement regarding the value of our selectmen, their present workload and 
their reluctance to vote on an increase for themselves. Mr. Galante requested we amend the 
Selectmen's salaries as follows: Increase salaries to $4,000 per year with the exception of the 
Chairman and his position to pay $4,200. Amendment carried. Vote passed to amend the 
Selectmen's salaries to be increased by $3,000 in total Vote $12,200.00 

Town Treasurer Expense 7,299.00 

No discussion. Vote $7,299.00 

Town Office Expense 176,811.00 

Frank Altomare questioned the phone expense. Vote $176, 81 1. 00 

Town Clerk/Tax Collector 78,536.00 

No discussion. Vote $78,536.00 

Election and Registration 7,000.00 

No discussion. Vote $7,000.00 



10 



Cemeteries 9,000.00 

Johanna Light asked for explanation of budget. Vote $9, 000. 00 

Government Buildings 43,661.00 

Rick Co^well asked if any of the money in the budget on page 44 is for OCC. No, the only 
exception has been roof repair. Rick asked the Selectmen to review the OCC contract to make 
sure that there is not any money spent on maintenance. Joe will follow up. 
Becky Burton asked if any of this money has been earmarked for the Rescue Squad. Tom said, 
"Yes, this also includes the services of our new maintenance man. " Tom acknowledged the 
electrical, insulation and other needs for that building. James Rines inquired about the 
$15, 000 increase in the budget. Tom Gaydoes explained that we have had to absorb the 
increase of maintenance formerly done by the recreation department such as field maintenance, 
grounds care, ice rink preparation etc. This work is now done by our maintenance man which 
is funded under Government Buildings. Vote $43,661.00 

Planning Board 6,135.00 

Vote $6,155,000 

Conservation Commission 1,700.00 

Vote $1,700.00 

Legal Expense 28,500.00 

Frank Altomare asked how this money was used. Tom Gaydos explained this was for use over 
and above the services received from our Municipal Dept. The Selectmen, Planning Board, and 
Tax Office have occasional need for legal advice. 

Dave Babson questioned why we have the Dam Authority listed under the legal expense. Joe 
said it was because we were under a legal alliance with the Town of Effingham. Joe did decide 
to remove it from this line in the future. Vote $28,500 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 3,237.00 

Vote $5,257.00 

Police Department 254,411.00 

(Original was $254,411.00) Voted to amend to exclude amount of $19,785 which was 
approved in Article 14. Vote on amendment passed. Vote $254,626.00 

Forest Fire Warden 9,000.00 

Vote $9,000.00 

Tovfn Maintenance 403,047.00 

Vote $405,047.00 

Street Lighting 2,300.00 

Conrad Primus, member of the Indian Mound Association, asked how to obtain street lights. 
The answer was by petitioning the Fire Precinct. The $2,500 we budget now is for the Town 
Hall Dave Babson asked if we could approve of some money to fix the broken light. According 
to our Selectmen the PSNH feels the "blinking" light is not broken. Maybe Dave Helme can 
help us with this "blinking" problem! Vote $2,500.00 

General Highway Expense 35,000.00 

Vote $55,000.00 

Highway Block Grant 97,792.00 

Johanna Light asked how much we get from the Government on this. We will get the full 
amount, but we must put it in our budget. In the long run it is a wash as it is offset by the 
grant. Johanna was confused with the bookkeeping of grants. Vote $97,792.00 

Conservation Agent. 2,000.00 

Vote $2,000.00 

Codes Enforcement Officer 9,000.00 

James Kazolias felt that maybe we should vote more money for this position as it appears the 
Codes Enforcement Officer does not have time to keep up with his workload. Joe Skehan said 



11 



that this position is a contract position and it is his job to enforce the present ordinances. It is 
not his job to go to job sites, only to interpret codes. Joe said if we were to hire him to enforce all 
of the codes this position would cost us about $65,000 per year. Vote $9,000.00 

Solid Waste Disposal 153,285.00 

Vote $153,285.00 

Health Department 39,437.00 

(Original was $39,437.00) Wayne Aleska asked why the VNA Hospice was excluded. He spoke 
on the value of this service and made a motion to amend this article to include an additional 
$2,200.00. The Selectmen and the Budget Committee at this point cautioned the people that if 
we keep increasing the budget we will be in for an additional tax increase. Randy Lyman, our 
State Representative, strongly suggested we support this amendment. Vote to amend passed. Vote 
$41,637.00 

Hospital and (Rescue) Ambulance 20,625.00 

Veronica Rogers asked why we voted on Article 10 if we have this line item. Joe Skehan said 
this should read 'Hospital and Rescue " not Hospital and Ambulance. Richard McQuade stated 
it appears we have duplication of services. Tom Gaydos explained the difference between them. 
Mr. McQuade encouraged us to consolidate the two services. Kemper expressed concern with the 
billing system. Rick Morgan explained that much of the money in this line items is for 
emergency equipment. Vote $20,625.00 

General Assistance 20,000.00 

Johanna Light is concerned that much of this money goes to individuals who are very capable of 
working. Joe Skehan made mention that on page 78 in our Town Report there is a listing of 
how the General Assistance is disbursed. Vote $20,000.00 

Animal Control : 7,240.00 

Vote $7,240.00 

Libraries 61,000.00 

Vote $61,000.00 

Recreation 82,607.00 

Marianne Masters, Recreation Director, asked to address the people. She read a summary of her 
history with the Town ofOssipee, her goals, the Town's goals and in some cases their differences. 
She expressed her gratitude to those who supported her and her department, as well as her 
disappointment with those who only found fault. In conclusion she announced her resignation, 
due to health reasons, and hoped that she has left some positive and genuine values for young 
people whom she worked with and cared so much for. A spontaneous standing ovation and 
applause was obviously a showing of appreciation for Marianne and her accomplishments. 
Marianne promoted and held ongoing programs for everyone from 2 years to 82 year olds. 
Several people stood and thanked her. Debbie Roberts asked where will the $82,607 be spent in 
light of Marianne's resignation. Joe Skehan said that we will have to begin our search and 
asked for help with coaching etc. in the meantime. Vote $82,607.00 

Patriotic Purposes 900.00 

Vote $900.00 

Long Term Debt - Principal 76,814.00 

James Kazolias asked, "What is this princiaU" Explanation was that this was for the Bonds for 
the Library, Town Sewer, Incinerator, Revaluation, and Dump Closure. Vote $76,814.00 

Long Term Debt - Interest 56,677.00 

Vote $56,677.00 

Tax Anticipation Note 30,000.00 

Johanna Light again asked why we budget this money. Tom explained how we have to borrow 
money in anticipation of taxes. Johanna was still confused and after the Moderator and 
Selectmen attempted to explain, the question was called. Vote to cease debate. Vote $30,000.00 



12 



Insurance 62,870.00 

Vote $62,870.00 

Water Department 61,460.00 

Johanna Light inquired about the $14,000 increase this year. Joe said on Page 50 you will see 
the amount of $57,557. Johanna asked again why we must show this and Joe said the State 
Form MS7 requires it. Vote $61,460. 00 

Sewer Department 63,339.00 

Vote $63,339.00 

Moved to amend Article 15 to read $1,905,298.00. Vote to amend to $1,905,298.00 

TOTAL 1,919,883.00 

VOTE TO PASS $1,905,298.00 PASSED 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to purchase a recycling bailer and to raise and 
appropriate the sum often thousand dollars ($10,000.00) for that purpose. (Recommended 
by the Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 
Motion made, seconded, opened for discussion. 

Bob Smith said this seems like chicken feed but he doesn 't feel we need this expense. He questioned 
the storage area, fire hazard and if proper research had been done to make sure this is a profitable 
venture. Joe stated that the people had wanted to go in the direction of recycling, although he 
personally does not favor it. We are no longer able to bum cardboard and we have to truck it out. 
We have done fairly well with out recycling thus far. Joe predicts a revenue of $5, 000 -$6,000 
within two years. Frank Altomare complained we are already spending too much money and felt 
this was not a necessity — wanted to put it off for another year. Additional statements and 
questions came from the floor and Frank Altomare made a motion to table. It was seconded and a 
2/3 vote denied the table effort. 
Article 16 Passed as read - 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into a lease 
agreement for the purpose of leasing an all wheel drive plow truck for the highway 
department, and to raise and appropriate the sum of eleven thousand dollars ($11,000.00) 
for the first year's payment for that purpose. (This amount is equal to the unspent balance 
from the previous year appropriation.) (Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by 
the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 
Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Veronica Rogers asked if anyone was aware that this truck was just to plow and sand in Granite. 
Tom explained that Granite is a very difficult place to maintain and this truck has the equipment 
to do it. It is expected to last ten years if used explicitly for the difficult areas. Mike Hart spoke in 
favor. Pat Swanson asked if it would be less expensive to contract the job out. It was felt that the 
people contracting would also need special equipment and their quoted price would most likely 
reflect the added expense. John Swanson, Budget Committee member, stated it would cost about 
$3,000 per year over the next 10 years which he felt was on the high side. Chuck OSullivan, 
Highway Dept. employee, felt our present truck is no longer reliable and supports this article for 
safety reasons as well as the needed dependability. James Rines called the question. 
Article 17 Passed as read 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to grant and raise seventy-eight hundred dolalrs 
($7,800.00) representing a twenty-five percent (25%) match to a Federal Grant for the 
purpose of hiring a new Police Officer. (Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended 
by the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 



13 



Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Richard McQuade questioned if this article would cover cost for just three years and what happens 

then. Chief Morgan said yes, and he hoped we would then be in the position to fund it ourselves. 

Morgan spoke of the needs in today's world of 24-hour coverage. James Kazolias spoke in favor of 

this. Dave Babson asked if there would be other cost involved. Morgan stated that cost of 

education and certification is free. 

Article 18 Passed as read 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town of Ossipec will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
one thousand ($1,000.00) dollars for support of Ossipee children using the services of the 
Bearcamp Valley School and Children's Center (Tamworth Pre-School, Inc.) for pre-school 
and before-and-afiter-schooi child care. (Submitted by Petition) (Recommended by the 
Selectmen) (Not Recommended by the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 
Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion 

Pete Sluski questioned why this was also under health budget. It isn 't; this is day care only. Vote 
taken in the affirmative, but a call from the floor from Warren Walker to take a hand count as it 
appeared to be a close call. Hand count taken by clerks and total was 77 yes, 52 no. 
Article 19 Passed as read 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise one thousand dollars 
($1,000.00) for the Ossipee Co-op Preschool. (In the past the organization has been awarded 
money and are requesting it again due to low enrollment and ever-increasing expenses.) 
(Submitted by Petition) (Not Recommended by the Selectmen) (Not Recommended by the 
Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 
Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Dave Babson asked why Article 19 was recommended by the Selectmen and not this article. Pat 
Jones, Selectperson, said that this was a clerical error — that it was recommended by the Selectmen. 
Article 20 Passed as read 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell a triangular 
piece of land approximately 1.0 acre in size, by boundary line adjustment, to James F. and 
Wanda L. Rines for $1,000. Said land, comprised of approximately 0.5 acres of "dry land" 
and 0.5 acres oPwetland" and situated directly behind the Rines' residence, being part of the 
1 1.5 acre lot upon which the Town Hall is currently situated and land that is unlikely to be 
used by the Town in the foreseeable future. (Submitted by Petition) (Majority Vote 
Required) 

Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

James Rines, the petitioner of this article, spoke on its merits. He felt that our Selectmen were not 
opposed to this. This will bring added revenue to the town. Elizabeth Sanders was opposed to 
town selling any of their property abutting the Town Hall as we do not know of the future needs. 
Article 21 Passed as read 

Joe Skehan made a motion to not reconsider any article between Article 8 and Article 21. The 
moderator read from the rules of the meeting regarding this motion. Vote to not reconsider taken 
and vote was in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue and relinquish all interests in an 
old portion of Route 16, reclassified from State Highway to Town Class V road by letter of 
December 16, 1955, identified as between stations 202 + 00- and 205 + 00, effecting lots on 
Town Tax Map 27, Lots 3, 4, and 5 along the east side of Route 16? (Majority Vote 
Required) 

14 



Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Joe Skehan stated that no records could be found to show where the town discontinued this road. 
In light that someone is now trying to purchase it, we should formally declare it discontinued. 
Article 22 Passed as read 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept the two tenths (0.2) Class 6-A portion 

of the road thereon: It is noted that the owner of the property therein pays a full and 

complete share of property taxes and therefore money for upkeep is already in the Town 

Budget. The Town of Ossipee now maintains to within 2/10 (2 tenths) of a mile from the 

end of the road (my driveway being at the end of the road). There is ample room to turn 

trucks or road equipment in this area. I have lived on Thurley Road for five (5) years and 

have requested yearly to be accepted to no avail. (Submitted by Petition) (Majority Vote 

Required) 

Motion, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Considerable discussion led by the petitioner, Sandra Martin. Her plea to extend services a mere 

.02 of a mile would not only help her but would ^ve the town trucks a better turnaround area. 

Whereas this road is a Class 6 and she is a year round resident, the road being in very good 

condition she asked that this article be passed. Rick Cogswell and Dave Babson asked further 

questions. Pete Slusky called the question. 

Article 23 Passed as read 

With the moderator noting the time being 11:00 PM it was put before the people to decide if we 
should continue rather than recess to another night as we were nearly finished. Vote to continue 
passed. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to reclassify, from Class VI road to Class V road, 
the first three tenths (.3 mile) of Marble Road and be maintained and kept open year round. 
(This three-tenths of a mile measurement to start at the intersection of Marble Road and 
Connor Pond Road.) This three-tenths of a mile stretch of road takes in the home of 
Bernard and Margueritte White. Illness has made this request even more urgent, and we 
would like to see this become effective as soon as possible. (Submitted by Petition) (Majority 
Vote Required) 

Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Rick Cogswell inquired as to the condition of the road. Tom Gaydos stated that it was in good 
condition for a mountain road, and this was confirmed by Ervin White. Margaret Castine felt it 
again was a good turnaround area for the truck drivers. Janice Andrea spoke in favor of it. 
Chuck O'Sullivan confirmed this road was in good condition. 
Article 24 Passed as read 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town of Ossipee, NH will vote to reclassify that portion of 0.9 
miles along Duncan Lake Road (from the intersection of Giles Road) from a class six to a 
class five Town maintained road? (Submitted by Petition) (Majority Vote Required) 
Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Mike Harte said that this road had been plowed in the past. It has been upgraded and is in 
superior condition. Rick Cogswell brought up the fact that we may be in error as we cannot 
convert a Class 6 road to a Class 5 road. If this is correct can we amend this to say "Classify as a 
Winter Plow Road Only"? The moderator objected to changing a petition from its original intent. 
Tom Gaydos reminded us that regardless of the status of the road the will of the people should 
prevail. Ken Leavitt said that from his planning board experience, we would be setting a precedent 
by doing this. We should be certain that this meets our present zoning as well. The procedure of 



15 



this article seems to remain in question. Ken Leavitt made a motion to table this article. Hand 
count was taken; 2/3 vote is needed. Vote of 64 Yes and 49 No was not enough t3 table this 
article. Robert Andrea stated that this road was subdivided in 1975 and questioned if it was 
classified Class 5 at that time. No, the town does not consider this an accepted road. The 
petitioner was disturbed that he was not told at the time he prepared the petition. With the 
Moderator still questioning the legality of this article, it was decided to accept the motion with the 
understanding that the Selectmen will work with the Town Attorney to clarify the status. Vote to 
cease debate passed. Had vote on this article: 59 in favor, 50 against. 
Article 25 Passed as read 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept, 
on behalf of the Town, gifts, legacies, and devises made to the Town in Trust for any public 
purpose, as permitted by RSA 31:19. (Majority Vote Required) 
Motion made, seconded and opened for discussion. 
A rticle 26 Passed as read 

ARTICLE 27. Shall the Town accept the provisions of RSA 202-A:4-c providing that any 

town at an annual meeting may adopt an Article authorizing indefinitely, until specific 

rescission of such authority, the Public Library Trustees to apply for, accept and expend, 

without further action by the Town Meeting, unanticipated money from a State, Federal or 

other governmental unit or private source which becomes available during the fiscal year? 

(Majority Vote Required) 

Motion, seconded and opened for discussion. 

Article 27 Passed as read ' 

ARTICLE 28. to hear reports of Agents, Auditors, Committees, or Officers thereto. 
No reports 

ARTICLE 29: To conduct any other business that may legally come before said meeting. 
James Rines thanked the people for supporting the sale of the land. 

Rick Cogswell thanked the voters who went to the School Meeting. He was pleased to see the 
change in the by-laws and the support of changing the school formula was very close and hopes it 
may pass next year. 

James Kazolias spoke once again about his view of the irregularities in the assessing process. He 
noted a few examples and asked if it could be looked into. The Moderator suggested he take this up 
with the Selectmen directly rather than at town meeting 

Elizabeth Sanders would like next year's Town Report to be in the same line order as the Budget 
in the Warrant. 

Jim Patterson made a motion to not reconsider Article 22-27. Voted in the affirmative. 
The Ballot Clerks arrived at 11:55 PM with the final tally of the Articles 2-7 The moderator 
read the results. 

Meeting adjourned at 12:00 AM. 

Respectfiilly submitted: 
Barbara R Admas, Town Clerk 



16 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

COUNTY OF CARROLL, SS. TOWN OF OSSIPEE 

TOWN WARRANT 

To the inhabitants of the Town of Ossipee in the County of Carroll, in the State 
of New Hampshire, qualified to vote in Town affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Town Hall in Center Ossipee, in 
said Town of Ossipee on the second Tuesday in March next, being the 12th day of 
March, 1 996 at ten o'clock in the forenoon (1 0:00 a.m.) of said day. 

To act on the Articles, the polls to remain open until seven o'clock in the 
evening (7:00 p.m.) of said day. 

ARTICLE 1 : To elect all necessary Town Officers for the ensuing year as follows: to 
choose one (1) Selectman for a term of three (3) years; one (1) Moderator for a 
term of two (2) years; one (1 ) Supervisor of the Checklist for a term of six (6) years; 
one (1 ) Cemetery Trustee for a term of three (3) years; one (1 ) Cemetery Trustee for 
a term of two (2) years; one (1 ) Cemetery Trustee for a term of one (1 ) year; one (1 ) 
Trustee of Trust Funds for a term of three (3) years; two (2) Budget Committee 
Members for a term of three (3) years; two (2) Library Trustees for a term of three 
(3) years; two (2) Planning Board Members for a term of three (3) years; and two (2) 
Zoning Board of Adjustment Members for a term of three (3) years. 

ARTICLE 2: Are you in favor of Amendment #96-1 for the Town Zoning Ordinance 
4.9 Travel Trailers and Campers as follows: To modify to allow occasional use of 
recreational vehicles on parcels of land, if parcels are used for not more than 
fourteen (14) days in any calendar year. The land owner must comply with the 
remainder of RSA 21 6-1: 1 3. (Intent of the Article: At present you may not camp on 
your own property. This amendment modifies Town Zoning Ordinance 4.9 and 
adopts state RSA 216-1: 13 which permits camping on your own property) 
( Submitted by Petition) ( Not Approved by the Planning Board) 

YES ( ) NO ( ) 

ARTICLE 3: Are you In favor of the adoption of Amendment #96-2 to the Ossipee 
Zoning Ordinance to rezone from "Village" to "Commercial" an area of land 
located in the area of town known as Ossipee Village and more particularly 
described as follows: Beginning at a point at the intersection of the easterly right of 
way line on NH Route 28 and Frenchman Brook, so called; thence in a general 
easterly direction along said Frenchman Brook to a point 500 feet from said 
easterly right of way line of NH Route 28; thence in a general southerly direction, 
running parallel to and 500 feet from the easterly right of way line of NH Route 28 
and Old Route 28, so called, to the southerly side of the Boston and Maine Rail 



17 



Road right of way; thence in a general westerly direction along the southerly right 
of way; thence in a general westerly direction along the southerly right of way line 
of said Rail Road, crossing Route 28, continuing to the westerly right of way line of 
Old Route 28; thence in a general southerly direction, 342 feet more or less, along 
the westerly right of way line of Old Route 28 to the southerly property line of Lot 
42 shown on Ossipee Tax Map 57, said lot now or formerly owned and/or leased 
by Ossipee Oil Co., Inc.; thence in a general westerly direction along said property 
line to the easterly right of way line of Route 28; thence in a general northerly 
direction along the easterly right of way line of NH Route 28 to the point of 
beginning, (Submitted by Petition) (Approved by the Planning Board) 

YES ( ) NO ( ) 

ARTICLE 4: Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment #96-3 as proposed by 
the Planning Board for the Ossipee Zoning Ordinance as follows: To avoid setback 
problems in locating signs Article XXXIII Definitions - SIGN which presently reads: 

SIGN:- A structure or device designed to inform or attract attention. 
Must be revised to read: 

SIGN: - A device designed to inform or attract attention. 

YES ( ) NO ( ) 

ARTICLE 5: Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment #96-4 as proposed by 
the Planning Board for the Ossipee Zoning Ordinance as follows: 
To eliminate contradicting language between Article 4.7 Parking and Storage of 
Unlicensed Vehicles and Article XXXIII Definition - Junkyards: 

Article 4.7 which currently reads 

4.7 PARKING AND STORAGE OF UNLICENSED VEHICLES 
In any district, no more than two (2) motor vehicles which require license 
plates, but which are without current license plates, shall be parked or stored 
except in authorized automobile sales areas, enclosed buildings, or approved 
junkyards. No more than two (2) specialty vehicles which do not require 
license plates, such as home made or factory constructed competition 
machines and shall be parked or stored out of sight from adjacent properties 
and may be subject to RSA 236: 111. This does not pertain to farm vehicles or 
other vehicles which are in constant use and do not require a license plate for 
such use. 
Must be revised to read 

4.7 PARKING AND STORAGE OF UNLICENSED VEHICLES 

In any district, not more than one (1) motor vehicle which requires license 

plates, but which is without current license plates, shall be parked or stored 



18 



except in authorized automobile sales areas, enclosed buildings or approved 
junkyards. No more than two (2) specialty vehicles which do not require 
license plates, such as home made or factory constructed competition 
machines and shall be parked or stored out of sight from adjacent properties 
and may be subject to RSA 236: 111. This does not pertain to farm vehicles or 
other vehicles which are in constant use and do not require a license plate for 
such use. 

YES ( ) NO ( ) 

ARTICLE 6: Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment #96-5 as proposed by 
the Planning Board for the Ossipee Zoning Ordinance as follows: 
To add to section 4.6, 4.6.9 Alternative Parking Standards: 

a. Parking Requirements for Shopping Centers: Summary Recommendations and 
Research Study Report. Urban Land Institute. Washington. 1982. 

b. Shared Parking. Urban Land Institute. Washington. 1990. 

c. Parking Generation. Institute of Transportation Engineers. Washington. 1987. 

YES ( ) NO ( ) 

ARTICLE 7: Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment #96-6 as proposed by 
the Planning Board for the Ossipee Zoning Ordinance as follows: 

Regarding section 34. 2. h. Personal Service Shop: To change Residential from "N" 
to "SE" and to change Rural from "N" to "SE". 

YES { ) NO ( ) 

ARTICLE 8: Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment #96-7 as proposed by 
the Planning Board for the Ossipee Zoning Ordinance as follows: 

To add to section 34.2, letter "o": fuel, oil, and propane dispensing and storage: 
Village SE, Residential N, Roadside Commercial P, Commercial P, Rural SE, and to 
add to section 35.2, letter "o": fuel, oil, and propane dispensing and storage - 
Virgin petroleum products, propane, LP gas, or similar products, which shall 
comply with Article 5.8 of the zoning ordinance and all applicable State and 
Federal laws and rules. 

YES ( ) NO ( ) 

You are also notified to meet at the Town Hall on Wednesday, March 1 3, 1 996, at 
six thirty o'clock in the evening (6:30 p.m.) to act on the following articles: 



19 



ARTICLE 9: To see if the meeting will approve of the cost items contained in a 
collective bargaining agreement between the Town and AFSCME Local 534 
covering the period between April ^, 1996 and March 30, 1999; those cost items 
totaling twenty seven thousand five hundred five dollars ($27,505.00) in the first 
contract year; twenty one thousand one hundred thirty seven dollars ($21,137.00) 
in the second contract year; and sixteen thousand nine dollars ($16,009.00) in the 
third contract year; and to make appropriation for the cost items in said first year. 
(Recommended by Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget Committee)(Majority 
Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 10: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of forty 
thousand dollars ($40,000.00) for use with Block Grant money to repair a portion 
of Moultonville Road. Said sum to be expended only if what is earmarked for the 
project is insufficient, and any portion unused Is to be returned to the taxpayers. 
(Recommended by the Selectmen)(Recommended by the Budget Committee) 
(Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 1 1 : To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of ten 
thousand dollars ($10,000.00) for capital improvements and repairs to the town 
hall to render it accessible to physically challenged individuals in compliance with 
the Americans with Disabilities Act. (Recommended by the Selectmen) 
(Recommended by the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 12: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) to be added to the Capital Reserve Fund 
established pursuant to Article 13 of the 1995 Town Meeting for the purpose of 
repairing State-owned roadways within the town under a two for one matching 
State aid program and to designate the Selectmen as agents to expend. 
(Recommended by Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget Committee) 
(Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 1 3: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of forty 
thousand dollars ($40,000.00) for the purpose of paying down a note obligation of 
the Ossipee Housing Trust which is guaranteed by the Town of Ossipee. 
(Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget Committee) 
(Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 14: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into 
a four year lease purchase agreement for the purpose of leasing a four wheel drive 
for use by the Police Department and to raise and appropriate the sum of seven 
thousand dollars ($7,000.00) for the first year's payment for that purpose. 
(Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget Committee) 
(Majority Vote Required) 

20 



ARTICLE 1 5: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter Into 
a five year lease purchase agreement for the purpose of leasing a highway plow 
truck complete with plow, wing, dump body, and sander and to raise and 
appropriate the sum of eight thousand dollars ($8,000.00) for the first year's 
payment for that purpose. (Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by 
the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 16: To see If the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into 
a five year lease purchase agreement for the purpose of leasing a one ton plow 
truck complete with plow, wing, dump body, and sander and to raise and 
appropriate the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000.00) for the first year's 
payment for that purpose. (Recommended by the Selectmen)(Recommended by 
the Budget Committee)(Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 1 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of two 
million one hundred forty six thousand two hundred eighty-seven dollars 
($2,146,287.00) for general municipal operations. (Recommended by the 
Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 

Board of Selectmen $"5 2,200.00 

Town Treasurer Expense 8,000.00 

Town Office Expense 181,259.00 

Town Clerk/Tax Collector 80,107.00 

Trustees of Trust Funds 2,000.00 

Election and Registration 10,000.00 

Cemeteries 9,000.00 

Government Buildings 53,150.00 

Planning Board 10,330.00 

Conservation Commission 1 ,700.00 

Ossipee Lake Dam Authority 12,062.00 

Legal Expense 25,000.00 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 4,100.00 

Police Department 266,162.00 

Cops Grant 5,846.00 

Forest Fire Warden 10,873.00 

Town Maintenance 414,568.00 

Street Lighting 2,600.00 

General Highway Expense 35,000.00 

Highway Block Grant 97,035.00 

Conservation Agent 2,000.00 

Solid Waste Disposal 198,193.00 

Health Department 40,236.00 



21 



Ambulance 61,000.00 

Rescue Squad 18,950.00 

Codes Enforcement Officer 12,000.00 

Economic Development 200.00 

General Assistance 15,000.00 

Animal Control 7,240.00 

Library 67,123.00 

Recreation Department 78,809.00 

Patriotic Purposes 500.00 

Long Term Debt - Principal 87,035.00 

Long Term Debt - Interest 57,1 79.00 

Tax Anticipation Note 30,000.00 

Insurance 68,689.00 

Water Department 85,000.00 

Sewer Department 72,141.00 

TOTAL $2,146,287.00 

ARTICLE 1 8: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of four 
thousand dollars ($4,000.00) to purchase a cardiac defibrillator, said sum to be in 
addition to any federal, state, private funds, or expendable trusts made available 
therefore, and to authorize the withdrawal of all funds from the Cardiac 
Defibrillator Capital Reserve Fund created for this purpose, estimated to be two 
thousand three hundred thirty six dollars ($2,336.00) plus interest to date of 
withdrawal and to combine these funds for the purchase of a cardiac defibrillator. 
(Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget Committee) 
(Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 19: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of two 
thousand dollars ($2,000.00) for the purchase of a computer for the Town 
Administrator. (Recommended by the Selectmen) (Recommended by the Budget 
Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 20: To see if the Town of Ossipee will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) for support of Ossipee children using the 
services of the Bearcamp Valley School and Children's Center, (Tamworth Pre- 
school, Inc.) for pre-school and before and after school child care. (Submitted by 
Petition) (Not Recommended by Selectmen) (Not Recommended by Budget 
Committee) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 21 : To see if the Town will vote to sell a .1 1 5 acre parcel of land located 
on Dore Street and identified on map 49 as lot 43 to Wayne Jenness, an abutter, 
for an amount to be negotiated by the Selectmen. (Recommended by the 
Selectmen) (Majority Vote Required) 



22 



ARTICLE 22: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to manage all town-owned conservation and forested lands and to 
see if the Town will vote to authorize that any revenue generated from the 
management of these properties go into the established Conservation Fund. 
(Recommended by the Selectmen) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 23: To see if the Town will vote to accept and classify Old Broad Bay 
Road as a class V town road, said road to be approximately two hundred yards 
(200) in length. (Submitted by Petition) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 24: To see if the Town of Ossipee will vote to accept the five tenths (0.5) 
mile of Moody Pond Road, to keep it open and maintained year round. It is noted 
that the owners of the properties therein pay a full and complete share of property 
taxes and therefore money for upkeep is already in the Town Budget. This stretch 
of road takes in two homes of legally handicapped individuals. Derec Button is in 
a coma living and being cared for at his family's home and James P. McCann, 
owner of the next house down, is blind. (Submitted by Petition) (Recommended by 
the Selectmen) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 25: To see if the Town will vote to accept the four Class VI roads within 
Blueberry Estates as Class V Town roads and accept responsibility for maintenance 
and plowing. (Submitted by Petition) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 26: To see if the Town will vote to discontinue and relinquish all interests 
in the .98 miles known as Brownell Road which is currently listed as a Class VI 
town road. (Recommended by the Selectmen) (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 27: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
accept, on behalf of the Town, gifts, legacies, and devises made to the Town in 
Trust for any public purpose, as permitted by RSA 31 : 19. (Majority Vote Required) 

ARTICLE 28: To hear reports of Agents, Auditors, Committees, or Officers thereto. 

ARTICLE 29: To conduct any other business that may legally come before said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal this 20th day of February, 1996. 

Board of Selectmen, Town of Ossipee 
Joseph G. Skehan, Jr. Patricia H. Jones, Sandra P. Martin 



23 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE CARROLL, SS Personally appeared the within 
named Joseph G. Skehan, Jr., Patricia H. Jones, and Sandra P. Martin, known to 
me to be the Selectmen of the Town of Ossipee, and made oath that the foregoing 
statements by the subscribed, are true to the best of their knowledge and belief. 

Before me, 
Martha B. Eldridge 
Justice of the Peace 



24 



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27 



TOWN CLERK 



YEAR 


REVENUE 


REVENUE 


TOTAL 


1992 


262.364 


5,726,653 


5,989,017 


1993 


288,309 


5,881,915 


6,170,224 


1994 


316,937 


6,515,870 


6,832,807 


•1995 


490,289 


7,189,671 


7,679.960 



FOR 1 995 $ 1 ,462.848 HAS BEEN DEDUCTED AND ADDED TO 1 994 BECAUSE TWO 

WEEKS OF 1994'S TAX MONEY WAS COLLECTED IN 1995. 

ACTUAL FIGURES FOR 1995 ARE $8,652,519 AND 1994 ARE $5.053022. 



<ft^nnn nnn 


TAX UEVENVE 




$7. 500, 000 
$7,000,000 
$6,500,000 
$6.000, 000 
$5, 500, 000 
$5,000,000 
$4, 500, 000 
$4,000, 000 




7 


,679, 960 




6 


1 
832, 807 


1 




6 


,170,224 


y//y/A''. 




5 


989, 03 


7 










1992 


1993 1994 *1995 





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31 



DEPARTMENT 1994 1995 



PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT 


6.242 


5,995 


CONSERVATION 


1,214 


1,139 


CONSERVATION AGENT 


1,546 


1,736 


PATRIOTIC EXPENSES 


1,490 


711 


ZONING APPEALS 


3,956 


4,742 


DAM AUTH/REVALUATION 


4,815 


11,050 


ANIMAL CONTROL 


5,628 


4,294 


LEGAL 


6,242 


27,518 


ELECTION REGISTRATIONS 


6,530 


3,911 


TREASURER 


6,579 


6,694 


CEMETARIES 


7,454 


8,167 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN 


7,700 


11,366 


CODE ENFORCEMENT 


8,312 


10,200 


RESCUE SQUAD 


10,522 


19,988 


FIRE WARDEN 


13,319 


10,052 


WELFARE 


18,600 


10,608 


TOWN HALL REPAIRS 


28,420 


46,005 


HEALTH DONATIONS 


37,900 


40,637 


WATER DEPARTMENT 


46,761 


66,190 


PROPERTY INSURANCE 


53,512 


64,496 


LIBRARY 


58,923 


60,652 


TOWN CLERK/TAX COLLECTOR 


75,621 


77,007 


RECREATION DEPARTMENT 


89,491 


62,592 


SEWER DEPARTMENT 


62,248 


62,101 


INCINERATOR 


162,306 


204,089 


SELECTMAN'S OFFICE & ASSESSING 


170,245 


183,970 


POLICE DEPARTMENT 


230,077 


266,607 


PRECINT TAXES 


292,486 


336,787 


HIGHWAY 


489,626 


566,629 



1,907,767 2,175,935 



32 



INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT 
ON FINANCIAL PRESENTATION, 1994 

To the Members of the Board of Selectmen, Town of Ossipee, Osslpee, New 
Hampshire: 

We have audited the accompanying general-purpose financial statements of 
the Town of Ossipee as of and for the year ended December 31, 1994, as listed in 
the table of contents. These general-purpose financial statements are the 
responsibility of the Town's management. Our responsibility is to express an 
opinion on these general-purpose financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit In accordance with generally accepted auditing 
standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain 
reasonable assurance about whether the general-purpose financial statements are 
free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, 
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the general-purpose financial 
statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and 
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall 
general-purpose financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit 
provides a reasonable basis for our opinion 

As described in Note 1 B, the general-purpose financial statements referred to 
above do not include the General Fixed Assets Account Group, which should be 
included to conform with generally accepted accounting principles. The amount 
that should be recorded in the General Fixed Assets Account Group is not known. 

In our opinion, except for the effect on the financial statements of the 
omission described in the preceding paragraph, the general-purpose financial 
statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial 
position of the Town of Ossipee as of December 31, 1994, and the results of its 
operations and cash flows of its nonexpendable trust funds for the year then ended 
in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. 

Our audit was made for the purpose of forming an opinion on the general- 
puipose financial statements taken as a whole. The combining and individual fund 
financial statements and schedules listed in the table of contents are presented for 
purposes of additional analysis and are not a required part of the general-purpose 
financial statements of the Town of Ossipee. Such information has been subjected 
to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the general-purpose financial 
statement and, in our opinion, is fairly presented in all material respects in relation 
to the general-purpose financial statements taken as a whole. 

Plodzik & Sanderson Professional Association 
February 1 , 1 995 



33 



INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT 
ON FINANCIAL PRESENTATION, 1995 

To the Members of the Board of Selectmen, Town of Ossipee, Osslpee, New 
Hampshire: 

We have audited the accompanying general-purpose financial statements of 
the Town of Ossipee as of and for the year ended December 31, 1995. These 
general-purpose financial statements are the responsibility of the Town's 
management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these general-purpose 
financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing 
standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain 
reasonable assurance about whether the general-purpose financial statements are 
free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, 
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the general-purpose financial 
statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and 
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall 
general-purpose financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit 
provides a reasonable basis for our opinion 

The general-purpose financial statements referred to above do not include the 
General Fixed Assets Account Group, which should be included in order to 
conform with generally accepted accounting principles. As is the case with most 
municipal entities in the State of New Hampshire, the Town of Ossipee has not 
maintained historical cost records of its fixed assets. The amount that should be 
recorded in the General Fixed Assets Account Group is not known. 

In our opinion, except for the effect on the financial statements of the 
omission described in the preceding paragraph, the general-purpose financial 
statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial 
position of the Town of Ossipee as of December 31, 1995, and the results of its 
operations and cash flows of its nonexpendable trust funds for the year then ended 
in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. 

Our audit was made for the purpose of forming an opinion on the general- 
purpose financial statements taken as a whole. The combining and individual fund 
financial statements listed in the table of contents are presented for purposes of 
additional analysis and are not a required part of the general-purpose financial 
statements of the Town of Ossipee. Such information has been subjected to the 
auditing procedures applied in the audit of the general-purpose financial statement 
and, in our opinion, is fairly presented in all material respects in relation to the 
general-purpose financial statements taken as a whole. 

Plodzik & Sanderson Professional Association 
January 31, 1996 



34 



TAX COLLECTOR'S FY1995 DEBIT/CREDIT SUMMARY 
As of December 31, 1995 

$ LEW '95 $ LEVY '94 $ PRIOR 

TAX ACCOUNT DEBITS 



UNCOLLECTED 12/31/94 








Property 


00.00 


2,554,509.35 


00.00 


Resident 


00.00 


00.00 


2,060.00 


Land Use Change 


00.00 


111,034.54 


00.00 


Yield 


00.00 


18,926.83 


00.00 


COMMII lED 








Property 


5,701,347.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Resident 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Land Use Change 


3,750.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Yield 


65,390.98 


00.00 


00.00 


SUPPLEMENTAL 








Property 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Resident 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


OVERPAYMENTS 


75.39 


239.30 


3.79 


INTEREST/PENALTIES 








Property 


6,620.95 


61,869.31 


00.00 


Resident 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Land Use Change 


10.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Yield 


78.80 


22,291.78 


00.00 




5,777,273.12 


2,768,871.11 


2,063.79 


TOTAL: $8,547,444.13 








TAX ACCOUNT CREDITS 









REMITTED 

Property 4,726,305.59 2,537,851.78 00.00 

Resident 00.00 00.00 00.00 

Land Use Change 1,750.00 00.00 00.00 

Yield 32,375.95 127,144.57 00.00 

Interest/Penalties 6,709.75 84,161.09 00.00 

DISCOUNTS ALLOWED 00.00 00.00 00.00 

ABATEMENTS 

Property 5,026.16 16,657.57 00.00 

Resident 00.00 00.00 00.00 

Land Use Change 00.00 00.00 00.00 

Yield 3,202.58 2,816.80 00.00 



35 



$ LEVY '95 


$ LEVY '94 


$ PRIOR 




DEEDED 








Property 


2,746.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Resident 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Land Use change 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Yield 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


OVERPAYMENTS 


75.39 


239.30 


3.79 


UNCOLLECTED 








Property 


967,269.25 


00.00 


00.00 


Resident 


00.00 


00.00 


2,060.00 


Land Use Change 


2,000.00 


00.00 


00.00 


Yield 


29,812.45 


00.00 


00.00 




5,777,273.12 


2,768,871.11 


2,063.79 


TOTAL: $8,547,444.13 








LIEN ACCOUNTS DEBITS 








UNREDEEMED 12/31/94 


00.00 


00.00 


548,911.51 


EXECUTED * 


00.00 


599,768.75 


00.00 


SUPPLEMENTAL 








Liens 


00.00 


1,466.93 


00.00 


INTEREST/COSTS COLLECTED 00.00 


10,540.61 


111,109.54 



00.00 
TOTAL: $1,270,619.23 

LIEN ACCOUNTS CREDITS 

PAYMENTS REMITTED 00.00 

INTERESTS/COSTS REMITTED 00.00 

ABATED 00.00 

DEEDS ISSUED ** 00.00 



611,776.29 



UNREDEEMED 



00.00 



157,953.75 

10,540.61 

7,324.14 

3,744.23 

432,213.56 



660,021.05 



354,867.40 

111,109.54 

1,641.69 

8,805.50 

183,596.92 



00.00 



611,776.29 



660,021.05 



TOTAL: $1,270,619.23 



** 



Includes interest, penalties, and costs to date of sale. 

Omits interest, penalties, and costs subsequent to date of sale. 



36 



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37 



REVENUES RECEIVED IN LIEU OF TAXES 



None 





TAX CREDITS 








Limits Number 


Est Tax 








Credits 


Disabled Veterans 


$700/$ 1400 


10 


$14,000 


Other War Service Credits 


$50/$ 100 


292 


29,350 


Total Number & Amount 




302 


$43,350 


ELECIRIQ GAS, & PIPELINE COMPANY 




Boston & Maine 






$164,800 


New England Telephone 






311,600 


New Hampshire Electric Cooperative 




2,233,000 


Public Service Co. of NH 






3,710,500 


Total 






$6,419,900 


ELDERLY EXEMPTION COUNT 






Number of Individuals 








48 at $10,000 






$480,000 


12 at $15,000 






180,000 


35 at $20,000 






700,000 


Total 


1 
CURRENT USE REPORT 




$1,360,000 


Farrrj Land 


473.03 






Forest Land 


17,839.23 






Unproductive Land 


715.98 






Wet Land 


1,120.30 







Total Number of Acres Exempted under Current Use 



20,148.54 



38 



STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATION 
Voted by the Town of Ossipee 

PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATION 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Executive $19,499 

Election, Registration, & Vital Statistics 7,000 

Financial Administration 255,347 

Legal Expense 28,500 

Planning and Zoning 9,372 

General Government Building 43,661 

Cemeteries 9,000 

Insurance 62,870 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Police 262,211 

Ambulance 60,000 

Fire 9,000 

BIdg. Inspection 9,000 

HIGHWAYS AND STREETS 

Highv^ays and Streets 535,839 

Street Lighting 2,300 

SANITATION 
Solid Waste Disposal 1 53,285 

HEALTH 

Pest Control 7,240 

Health Agencies and Hospitals 64,262 

WELFARE 

Direct Assistance 20,000 

CULTURE AND RECREATION 

Parks and Recreation „ 82,607 

Library 61,000 

Patriotic Purposes 900 

CONSERVATION 
Other Conservation 3,700 

DEBT SERVICE 

Principal - Long Term Bonds & Notes 76,814 

Interest - Long Term Bonds & Notes 56,677 

Interest on TAN 30,000 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Machinery, Vehicles, & Equipment 69,000 

Buildings 20,000 



39 



Improvements Other Than Buildings 296,000 

OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 

Sewer 63,339 

Water 61,460 

To Capital Reserve Fund 25,000 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS $2,404,883 



SOURCE OF REVENUE 

TAXES 

Yield Taxes 61,000 

Interest & Penalties on Delinquent Taxes 185,000 

LICENSES, PERMITS, AND FEES 

Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 239,1 82 

Other Licenses, Permits & Fees 23,000 

FROM STATE 

Shared Revenue 97,792 

Highway Block Grant 45,908 

FROM OTHER GOVERNMENT 
NH Railroad 980 

CHARAGES FOR SERVICES 

Income from Departments 105,000 

MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 

Sale of Municipal Property 22,850 

Interest on Investments 14,000 

Other 5,214 

INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 

Sewer 63,339 

Water 61,460 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 
General Fund Balance (For Municipal Use) (4477,032) 

TOTAL REVENUES AND CREDITS $924,725 



40 



1995 TOWN CLERK RECEIPTS 



Articles of Agreements 


5 


Auto Registration 


5,204 


Auto Decals Sold 


2,224 


Auto Titles 


989 


Bad Check Charges 


5 


Boat Taxes Collected 


83 


Certified Copies 


187 


Copies, photo 




Dog Penalties Charged 


63 


Dog Registrations 


521 


Fax Charges 


22 


Filing Fees, Election 


6 


Pole License, Telephone Co. 


2 


Postage Receipts 




Recount Election Receipt 


1 


Research Charge 


1 


Supplies Sold 




UCC Filings 


215 


Voter Cards 


8 


Water/Sewer Collections 


1,403 


Wedding Applications 


35 


Wetland Applications 


9 



$ 25.00 

313,110.00 

4,448.00 

1,979.00 

65.53 

17,176.07 

1,402.00 

96.25 

298.00 

3,280.10 

22.50 

6.00 

10.00 

29.92 

10.00 

52.00 

3.89 

3,084.10 

32.00 

143,489.94 

1,575.00 

94.25 



TOTAL 10,983 $490,289.55 

Notes from the Town Clerk's Office . . . 

We are happy to announce that our first restoration project has been 
completed. The marriage, birth, and death records from 1842-1940 have been 
professionally preserved in hard-bound books. Now we can work with the original 
documents without risk of damage. 

Our next project will be binding the Town Reports in ten-year increments. 
Once bound they will be easier to use and less apt to become lost. We assume 
that as Town Clerks have changed through the years and worked In various 
locations, this may be why we are lacking some Town Reports. Our ultimate goal 
will be to complete three sets from 1876 to the present. The volumes will cost 
$100 each to bind. 

We have a list of the missing books. We hope that there are some generous 
townspeople who may be willing to donate or loan these town reports to us so that 
we may duplicate them. We will be budgeting for two volumes each year, but 
would appreciate any donations. Anyone wishing to donate a volume will have a 
dedication page of their choice. 



41 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

Reconciliation of Cash Books and Bank Balances 

Year Ending December 31, 1995 

GENERAL CHECKING ACCOUNT 

Balance on Hand January 1 , 1 995 $37,022.07 

Receipts During Year 1 995 12.381.431.56 

12,418,453.63 
Less Disbursements 1 995 12.247.093.16 

Balance in Account December 31, 1995 171,360.47 

MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT 

Balance December 31 , 1 995 800,608.64 

SEWER ESCROW ACCOUNT 

Balance December 31,1995 7.718.81 

CASH BALANCE DECEMBER 31 , 1 995 $979,687.92 

PROOF OF BALANCES 
BALANCES OF ACCOUNTS, FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Balance on Hand, General Checking Account 543,626.49 

Add Deposits in Transit 92,134.25 

635,760.74 
Less Outstanding Checks 464.400.27 

Balance Checking Account December 31, 1995 171,360.47 

Balance Money Market Account 797,71 5.31 
Add Deposits in Transit 2.893.33 

Balance in Money Market Account 800,608.64 
Balance in Sewer Escrow Account 7.718.81 

RECONCILED BALANCE DECEMBER 31, 1995 $979,687.92 

Respectfully submitted, 
Thomas L. Galante, Treasurer 
Susan Simpson, Deputy Treasurer 



42 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



Conservation Agent 
Salary 



TOWN OFFICERS' SALARIES 

Conservation Agent 

Selectmen 



Tax Collector/Town Clerk 



Salaries 

Health Insurance 

PICA 

Medicare 

Retirement 

Equipment Maintenance 

Unemployment 

Worker's Compensation 

Telephone 

Election Supplies 

Supplies 

Postage 

Mileage 

Book Binding 

Recording 

School & Seminar Expense 

TOTAL 

Ballot Clerks 

Supervisors 

PICA 

Medicare 

Unemployment 

Worker's Compensation 

Advertising 

Supplies 

TOTAL 

Salary 

Deputy Salary 
PICA 
Medicare 
Unemployment 



Election & Registration 



Treasurer 



$1735.53 

$11,366.04 

$52,186.24 

4,347.96 

3,235.55 

756.70 

907.86 

1,743.75 

141.70 

992.39 

1,140.18 

450.00 

2,023.60 

3,391.75 

219.40 

190.00 

4,618.00 

662.24 

$77,007.32 

$613.09 

2,455.00 

190.23 

44.48 

14.16 

107.86 

138.50 

347.98 

$3,911.30 

$5,499.96 

328.00 

361.32 

84.50 

14.16 



43 



Worker's Compensation 

Mileage 

TOTAL 

Salaries 

Town Administrator 
PI Wages 
Health Insurance 
Life Insurance 
PICA 
Medicare 
Retirement 
Unemployment 
Worker's Compensation 
Longevity 
Audit 
Assessor 
Telephone 
Equipment Contracts 
Professional Services 
Town Reports 
Computer Maintenance 
' Advertising and Notices 
Tax Maps 
NHMA Dues 
Office Supplies 
Postage 

Mileage Expense 
Recording 

School & Seminar Expense 
New Equipment 
TOTAL 

Legal Expenses - General 
Dam Authority 
TOTAL 

Secretary 

PICA 

Medicare 

Unemployment 

Worker's Compensation 



Selectmen's Office 



Legal Expenses 



Planning Board 



118.10 

288.00 

$6,694.04 

$47,173.91 

37,101.59 

8,280.51 

10,887.54 

192.50 

6,032.96 

1,575.75 

2,602.99 

212.54 

1,520.92 

250.00 

7,344.00 

18,485.85 

4,165.41 

1,854.28 

1,976.25 

3,520.00 

4,172.50 

4,458.14 

2,135.63 

1,306.71 

11,075.89 

4,044.40 

1,708.57 

746.00 

1,581.41 

436.08 

$183,970.17 

$27,518.13 

11,050.00 

$38,568.13 

$1,382.73 

85.73 

20.06 

4.95 

35.92 



44 



Advertising 73.60 

Office Supplies 579.37 

Postage 254.70 

Recording 82.00 

Workshops 45.00 

Lakes Region Planning 3,431.00 

TOTAL $5,995.06 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Secretary $1,368.50 

PICA 84.84 

Medicare 19.85 

Unemployment 2.49 

Worker's Compensation 15.36 

Advertising 2,348.66 

Supplies/Publications 303.37 

Postage 356.26 

Education 243.00 

TOTAL $4,742.33 

Government Buildings 

PT Wages $9,574.69 

PICA 777.91 

Medicare 138.35 

Unemployment 35.42 

Worker's Compensation 256.97 

Electric 7,934.84 

T-Hall Fuel 2,437.80 

Garage Fuel 390.05 

Other Building Fuel 7,351 .89 

Water Rent 1,096.73 

Sewer Rent 956.25 

Chemical Toilets 2,380.00 

Vehicle Maintenance 574.88 

Maintenance 7,358.10 

G Maintenance 2,299.69 

Supplies 2,186.21 

Furniture 251.70 

TOTAL $46,005.48 

Cemetery 

PT Wages $7,065.50 

PICA 438.07 

Medicare 102.45 

Unemployment 14.16 



45 



Worker's Compensation 


128.52 


Water Rent 


202.00 


Headstone Maintenance 


216.02 


TOTAL 


$8,166.72 


Insurance 




General 


$47,103.26 


Cobra-BC 


17,391.92 


TOTAL 


$64,495.18 


Police Department 




Chief's Salary 


$31,665.82 


Secretary 


19,840.00 


Sergeants & Patrolmen's Salary 


100,717.46 


Specials' Salary 


6,903.87 


Holiday Pay 


5,038.00 


Health Insurance 


33,698.00 


Life Insurance 


291.28 


PICA 


1,639.62 


Medicare 


2,446.75 


Retirement 


5,769.99 


Unemployment 


1,174.77 


Worker's Compensation 


8,469.99 


Longevity 


400.00 


Telephone 


3,033.23 


Uniforms 


2,382.50 


Uniform Maintenance 


1,500.00 


Conferences & Dues 


612.00 


Office Supplies 


2,465.98 


General Maintenance 


753.46 


Tires 


1,340.16 


Radio Maintenance 


554.67 


Building Maintenance 


96.75 


Gasoline 


4,781.20 


Replacement of Equipment 


2,421.54 


Training 


998.28 


Investigative Supplies 


489.44 


Special Article - Lease of Cruisers 


15,288.27 


TOTAL 


$254,773.03 


Police Grant 




Grant Wages 


$6,247.39 


Grant Holiday Pay 


1,007.12 


Grant Health insurance 


3,806.02 


Grant Life Insurance 


20.24 



46 



Grant Medicare 214.19 

Grant Retirement 391.23 

Grant Unemployment 36.72 

Grant Worker's Compensation 111.17 

TOTAL $11,834.08 

Dog Warden 

Salary $1,726.00 

Expenses 1 56.00 

PICA 586.74 

Medicare 25.03 

Unemployment 7.08 

Worker's Compensation 51 .47 

Supplies 174.95 

Humane Society 830.00 

Mileage 736.60 

TOTAL $4,293.87 

Fire Warden 

Fire Warden Expenses $10,052.33 

Code Enforcement 

Codes $10,199.76 

Highway Department 

Full Time Wages $182,133.76 

Part Time Wages 5,062.00 

Overtime 31,097.81 

Health Insurance 37,857.28 

Life Insurance 370.04 

FICA 13,676.80 

Medicare 3,197.07 

Retirement 6,213.14 

Unemployment 3,576.12 

Worker's Compensation 25,280.93 

Longevity 2,200.00 

Telephone 321.72 

Uniforms 4,114.19 

Contract Equipment 3,910.00 

Electric 649.31 

Contract Plowing 10,970.00 

Radio Contract Maintenance 1 94.00 

Gasoline 6,583.91 

Mileage 1,131.00 

Sand & Gravel 50,015.30 

Dust Control 36,184.37 



47 



Salt 

Tar 

Culvert 

Equipment Purchased 

TOTAL 



General Highway Expenses 

Highway Block Grant 

Street Lighting 

Incinerator 



Full Time Wages 

Part Time Wages 

Health Insurance 

Life Insurance 

PICA 

Medicare 

Retirement 

Unemployment 

Worker's Compensation 

Longevity 

Telephone 

Uniforms 

Electric 

Fuel 

Equipment & Maintenance 

Hauling & Dumping 

Demolition 

Hazardous Waste 

Test Wells Monitor 

Ash Disposal 

Ash Testing 

TOTAL 

Ossipee Concerned Citizens 
Wolfeboro VNA 
CC Mental Health 
Community Action Program 
Family Planning 
Ossipee Children's Fund 
Domestic Violence 



Health 



16,650.37 

4,891 .63 

4,228.40 

2,950.00 

$453,459.15 

$34,696.55 

$75,640.79 
$2,832.68 

$58,948.32 

8,682.41 

10,880.80 

120.06 

4,217.91 

986.42 

1,345.06 

1,105.23 

7,861 .82 

400.00 

568.81 

1,213.40 

4,572.39 

11,188.75 

15,598.83 

38,728.51 

22,944.35 

2,829.00 

4,120.00 

4,796.80 

2,980.00 

$204,088.87 

$10,000.00 
13,000.00 
4,188.00 
8,200.00 
2,198.00 
2,000.00 
851.00 



48 



Big Brother & Big Sisters 200.00 

TOTAL $40,637.00 

Hospital & Ambulance 

Rescue Squad $19,988.00 

General Assistance 

$10,607.92 
Recreation Department 

Director Salary $1 8,447.50 

Assistant Wages 2,685.02 

Summer Camp - PI Wages 1 1 ,640.1 9 

Lifeguard Wages 2,498.25 

Health Insurance 4,896.56 

Life Insurance 30.36 

Recognition/Awards 420.02 

PICA 2,186.81 

Medicare 496.14 

Retirement 322.16 

Unemployment 389.66 

Worker's Compensation 2,774.70 

Telephone 1,268.80 

Uniforms 320.00 

Insurance 1,242.00 

Annual Fees 430.00 

Activities 5,468.23 

Supplies 1,682.23 

Mileage 578.91 

Equipment 4,814.37 

TOTAL $62,591.91 

Library 

Expenses $20,595.00 

Library Salaries 18,541.25 

PI Wages 12,653.14 

Health Insurance 5,869.80 

PICA 1,934.06 

Medicare 452.33 

Retirement 489.76 

Unemployment 14.16 

Worker's Compensation 102.75 

TOTAL $60,652.25 

Patriotic Purposes 

$711.00 



49 



Conservation Commission 



Secretary Wages 


$354.02 


PICA 


21.96 


Medicare 


5.13 


Unemployment 


1.41 


Worker's Compensation 


9.70 


Dues & Workshop 


205.00 


Supplies 


67.24 


Reference Materials 


195.00 


Summer Camp Program 


275.00 


Equipment 


4.95 


TOTAL 


$1,139.41 


Debt Service 




Sewer Bond Principal 


$8,500.00 


Incinerator Principal 


10,670.00 


Library Note Principal 


20,000.00 


RevaL/Dump Closure 


20,616.00 


Library Note Interest 


18,690.00 


Sewer Bond Interest 


6,600.00 


Incinerator Interest 


7,682.42 


Interest on TAN Note 


37,232.02 


TOTAL 


$129,990.44 


Special Articles 




Art. #08 Rescue Truck 


$48,000.00 


Art. #09 Bridges 


7,403.00 


Art. #1 1 Elm Street Project 


40,000.00 


Art. #12 Town Hall ADA 


6,885.00 


Art. #13 State Aid Highway 


25,000.00 


Art. #1 7 Highway 4x4 Plow Truck 


61,000.00 


Art. #19 Bearcamp School 


1,000.00 


Art. #20 Ossipee Co-Op Preschool 


1,000.00 


Art. #21 Lord's Ambulance 


57,065.14 


Art. #27 Highway Truck 


17,023.44 


TOTAL 


$264,376.58 


Encumbered Funds 




Legal Expenses 


$9,000.00 


Insurance Expenses 


3,900.00 


Highway Block Grant 


43,203.88 


Rescue Squad 


11,950.00 


Revaluation 


41,165.59 


TOTAL 


$109,219.47 



50 



Water Department 

Supervisor Salary $14,201.76 

PT Wages 12,213.26 

Health Insurance 5,439.22 

Life Insurance 45.88 

PICA 1,655.34 

Medicare 379.61 

Retirement 433.79 

Unemployment 1 70.04 

Worker's Compensation 1,181 .81 

Longevity 550.00 

Audit 300.00 

Telephone 680.38 

Computer 948.30 

Uniforms 517.65 

Electric 569.87 

Heat 449.87 

Building Maintenance 67.49 

System Maintenance 21,972.61 

Insurance 947.00 

Office Supplies 372.34 

Postage 298.87 

Gasoline 306.39 

Vehicle Maintenance 99.50 

Mileage 538.52 

Schools & Seminars 53.50 

Equipment Expense 1,796.96 

Sampling Tests .39 

TOTAL $66,190.35 

Sewer Department 

Supervisor Wages $13,593.52 

PT Wages 12,213.28 

Gasoline 357.76 

Health Insurance 5,439.15 

Life Insurance 45.86 

FICA 2,326.89 

Medicare 382.20 

Retirement , 433.75 

Unemployment 170.04 

Worker's Compensation 1 ,^ 81 .81 

Audit 300.00 

Telephone 1,113.13 



51 



Computer 948.30 

Test Wells 5,500.00 

Uniforms 517.65 

Electric 10,458.62 

Heat 324.90 

System Maintenance 1,367.44 

Insurance 1,941.00 

Office Supplies 447.33 

Postage 302.24 

Vehicle Maintenance 539.47 

Building Maintenance 440.40 

Mileage 538.52 

School & Seminars 97.50 

Equipment Maintenance 1,120.71 

TOTAL $62,101.47 

County Tax 

Treasurer, Carroll County $214,713.00 

Regional School District 

Governor Wentworth Regional $4,21 7,301 .00 

Precincts 

Center Ossipee Fire Precinct $144,731 .00 

West Ossipee Fire Precinct 79,790.00 

Ossipee Corner Light & Power 1 1 2,266.00 

TOTAL $336,787.00 



52 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

1995 ANNUAL REPORT 

The following pages list the basic funds and investments of the trust funds of the 
Town of Ossipee. On this page we will mention a few specific items for your 
information. 

It has been a good year investment-wise for the trustees, as investments were 
made in a variety of accounts when the interest rates were at their highest points of 
the year. In addition we placed the funds in at a relatively long investment period 
of 1 2 months to 1 8 months. Hopefully by the time they mature rates will be on the 
rise. 

In order to protect the funds to the full coverage of the FDIC (maximum of 
$100,000.00), we have spread the funds into three major investment strategies: 
Savings accounts (including Money-market), Certificates of Deposit, and Treasury 
Bills. 

Trust fund disbursements this year included $8,000.00 for "Lyford Merrow" 
scholarships to 7 Ossipee residents graduating from high school and heading for 
college. 

In addition, a special grant from the "Rena Merrow" trust in the amount of 
$3,599.00 was forwarded to Kingswood High School for needed equipment in the 
Science and Industrial Arts Departments. 

Also over $4,000.00 was transferred to the Town of Ossipee for cemetery 
maintenance. 

A grant was made from the "Lyford Merrow" hospital fund to aid an Ossipee 
resident who was indigent and unable to pay her hospital account. 

Your trustees will continue to pursue a safe and proper plan of action to guard 
and increase the trust fund income for the use of the Town of Ossipee and her 
citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 
George F. Lynch, Chairman 
June Loud, Trustee 
Joan Bishop, Trustee 



53 



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55 



OSSIPEE PUBLIC LIBRARY REPORT 

Each year, the report from Ossipee Public Library begins the same way "...it was a 
busy year at the Library..." This year is no exception! Circulation for the year 
increased by 16% overall, with the increases of 23.7% in adult non-fiction, 41.7% 
in children's non-fiction and 49.5% in videos especially noteworthy. January saw a 
weekly story hour with Mrs. Dale Tucker and her wonderful crafts and tours and 
story time for Headstart children. Circulation of Library materials increased 54% 
over January of 1 994! 

February was the beginning of the tax assistance on Tuesdays in the Library 
Meeting Room and a "groundhog" story time. Mrs. Lambert, Library Director, was 
asked to give a "Book Talk" to the members of the Second Congregational Church 
In celebration of their "Women's Week." She chose books that had strong women 
as their central characters and discussed how children's books had evolved towards 
women's equality. Mrs. Lambert traveled to the Vocational Education Center in 
Wolfeboro to receive a gift of children's books from the Guidance Counselors of 
the Governor Wentworth School District. 

In March, "Connections" returned to the Library. "Connections" is a program for 
adult students that enables them to study and discuss children's literature and share 
their books with their own families. As a thank-you to Mrs. Lambert, the Headstart 
children invited her to their classrooms for luncheon and stories. A good time was 
had by all. The Nursery school placed the Library on Its list of community places to 
visit. The children shared a special story and tour. 

April concluded the tax assistance In the Meeting Room and saw award 
winning children's author and illustrator, Kevin Hawkes, give a delightful program 
for all ages. The "Connections" program continued. We were very pleased to 
welcome new member Yvonne Fisher to our staff. 

In May, we saw the return of our summer patrons reflected in our circulation 
figures — a 50% increase over May 1994! The Eighth Annual Herb and Perennial 
Sale was held on the Library lawn (during National Herb Week). This sale Is 
becoming a tradition in the Ossipee area with so many quality plants at reasonable 
prices. The Friends of Ossipee Public Library, in their never-ending support of the 
Library, held a plant sale just in time for Mother's Day. The Library Director was 
awarded a partial scholarship from the New Hampshire Federated Women's Club 
and traveled to Jackson to make an acceptance speech. Trustees from the Freedom 
Library toured our lovely building, perhaps In anticipation of an addition to their 
Library. May also saw the end of the weekly story time just in time to gear up for 
the summer reading program. A special thanks Is extended to Mrs. Dale Tucker for 
sharing her many skills with the pre-school crowd. The installation of our new 
exterior sign on the Library lawn brought much encouragement and many helpful 
suggestions from Saturday morning Post Office customers to Installers Dick Zlegler, 
Peter Lambert and Benjamin Lambert. The sign is a lovely, informative addition to 
the Library grounds. 

56 



In June, registration for the summer reading program began. The Ruth M. 
Loring Memorial Shakespeare Herb Garden was a featured stop on the Ossipee 
Children's Fund "Summer Garden Tour." Over 75 people were given tours of the 
Herb Garden by the Library Director. Copy books were on display from a fifth 
grade class from Ossipee Central School. A fax machine, donated by a patron, has 
become a much-relied-on piece of technology in the Director's office. The New 
Hampshire State Library began a program called "Article Express" wherein a patron 
may request a magazine article, fill out a simple form and the Director faxes the 
form into the State Library. Sometimes the turn-around time has been as little as 
minutes. Before, this service may have taken as long as two to three weeks. Arietta 
Paul, Curator of the Ossipee Historical Society, Natalie Peterson and the Library 
Director hung a display of portraits and posters of local interest in the Meeting 
Room in honor of "Old Home Week." This display, which continued into July, was 
very popular. During "Old Home Week" the Library Meeting room was transformed 
into a tea room for eleven little girls, their dolls and carriages. "Mini Neighborhood 
Quilt" wall hanging classes, taught by local quilter Sue Stern, were held on 
Mondays in the Meeting Room. The theme of the summer reading program, "Saddle 
Up A Good Book," proved to be a popular one. We had 82 children signed up by 
July 5. We decided that, in keeping with that theme, we would read an American 
Tall Tale and a Native American Legend each week (along with other "western" 
books). Our weekly attendance averaged 55 well-behaved attentive children. We 
had terrific guest readers: Josh Libby and Stacy Libby, and Adele Schwelzer. Josh 
and Stacy came to us via the "Youth Works" program. These teens learned to shelve 
books, assist at the circulation desk and do whatever task we needed help with. 
They worked at the Library for six weeks and we can't say enough good about these 
teens and the work they did. Ms. Schweizer came to us from the First NH Bank in 
Ossipee. The First NH Bank helped underwrite the cost of the materials used in the 
summer reading program and Ms. Schwelzer volunteered to read to the children. 
She came to the library in full cowgirl regalia, much to the children's delight. 
Another guest, William Cleveland, came In his coureur de bois costume and 
explained about life in the days of the trappers and explorers. He encouraged the 
children and adults in attendance to handle his many authentic artifacts and 
experience the sound of a fully charged musket. Storyteller "Skunkman," otherwise 
known as Ed Fayle, entertained us with his story of "Lightnin"' and their gold find. 
Besides these programs, the Little Red Wagon Caravan entertained over 130 
children and adults on the Library lawn. As part of the children's "western" 
experience, we decided to make a quilt together. Quilt patterns and construction 
were discussed each week and 24 children designed their own blocks to be 
incorporated into "their" quilt. On the last week of the reading program, we held an 
ol' fashion quilting bee. The children tied their quilt, enjoyed authentic 
refreshments (served by Adele Schweizer) and visited with each other as in the "old 
days." This wonderful quilt has become a permanent part of the children's section 



57 



of the library where it is on display. Many thanks to the Moms who helped — Linda 
Morgan, Nancy White and Bonnie Nystedt. At the end of the summer reading 
program, each of the children registered received a certificate and a coupon for a 
meal from McDonald's in West Ossipee. Each child that read six books or more 
received a book, along with their certificate and coupon. The top five readers 
received those prizes and a T-shirt. Over 2,000 books were read. Our top reader 
read or listened to 137 books. Thanks to all the parents, day care providers and 
others who read to these children. An organizational meeting for the making of a 
quilt to benefit the PTA's Pennies for Playground kicked off In the Meeting Room. 

August was the Friends of Ossipee Public Library's annual "Feaster's Fantasy 
Raffle." This year's proceeds were to be used as matching funds for a grant awarded 
to the Library by the Libri Foundation of Eugene, Oregon. The grant, BOOKS FOR 
CHILDREN, written by the Director, enabled the Library to select $1,050.00 worth 
of quality children's fiction and nonfiction books. One stipulation of the grant was 
that 1/3 of the money be raised by an outside organization. The Friends were only 
too happy to oblige. The Governor Wentworth Arts Council met in the Library 
Meeting Room after receiving a tour of the building. The Arts Council generously 
donated $100.00 to be used to help underwrite a program which we used to help 
pay for the Little Red Wagon Caravan. 

September gave us a chance to catch our breath but we were in full swing in 
October. The Ossipee Co-Op Preschool came in for a visit, tour and story. 

On each Saturday in October we held the "On your way to the dump story 
hour." Guest readers included Yvonne Fisher, Polly Sheffer, Cousin Grizelda (Uncle 
Fester's cousin — Uncle Fester was not able to come this year) and storyteller "Ed." 
"Ed" brought his treasure chest and shared its contents with the children, along with 
a story. Cousin Grizelda, visiting for Halloween, had treats for good boys and girls. 
Library staff and patrons were treated to a Halloween parade in the Library from 25 
of the Ossipee Crossing Daycare children. They were in turn treated to spooky 
stories and bookmarks. Three groups of fifth graders visited the Library for tours and 
explanation of the "Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature." A quilting bee, held in 
the Library meeting room, started the squares for the PTA's "Pennies for Playground" 
raffle quilt. Library staff was excited to receive the shipment of books from the Libri 
Grant. It took us some time to process the 68 books, but it was a task that everyone 
enjoyed. After much time and energy. Library policies were updated, signed and 
enacted. Copies were sent off to the State Library for their records. 

In November Effingham resident Ken Zilisch presented his one-man show with 
an opening reception on a Monday evening. The popular exhibit hung for 
November and December. Mr. Zilisch kindly donated a percentage of the sales 
from the show to the Library. The New Hampshire Board of Trustees held an 
informational meeting in the Meeting Room for area Library Trustees. As part of 
their curriculum, the Ossipee Crossing Daycare brought the older children over to 
the Library each Wednesday for browsing, reading, stories and tours. New 



58 



Hampshire author Rebecca Rule entertained many with readings from her works, 

signed books and enjoyed tea and refreshments. 

Mrs. Santa Claus's visit to the Library in December brought smiles to Ossipee 

children. Mrs. Claus read to children, delivered lists to Santa for them and joined 

them in singing carols. Storyteller "Ed" entertained pajama-clad children with 

his rendition of "The Polar Express." To thank him, the children sang songs and 

recited poems. The meeting room was the site for a Gramm for President campaign 

appearance. 

Personnel: 

In May, Library Director Lindalee Lambert earned her Library Techniques 

Certificate Program through the University System of New Hampshire College for 

Lifelong Learning and New Hampshire State Library by completing the following 

courses: Public Library Administration, Children's and Young Adult Literature and 

Storytelling. Library Aide Polly Sheffer completed Public Library Administration, 

Children's and Young Adult Literature and Micro-computers in Libraries, and 

Library Aide Yvonne Fisher completed the Micro-computers in Libraries and the 

Children's and Young Adult's Literature courses. 

Some of the meetings attended by Library staff: 

RALI (Rochester Area Libraries) 

CCLC (Carroll County Libraries Cooperative) 

New Hampshire Library Association Spring Conference 

New Hampshire Library Association Fall Conference 

"Read to Me" 

"First Wednesday" Meetings at the State Library 
Groups that used the Library meeting room: 

Chamber of Commerce 

Ossipee Children's Fund 

Habitat for Humanity 

Carroll County N.O.W. 

R.A.L.I. (Rochester Area Libraries) 

New Hampshire Library Trustees 

Friends of Ossipee Public Library 

Ossipee Valley Woman's Club 

Ossipee Historical Society 

Effingham/Ossipee P.T.A. — Pennies for Playground 

Economic Development 
Ossipee Public Library would not be the same place if it were not for our 
volunteers. They perform a myriad of tasks — ^from cataloging to shelving books. In 
May, Mrs. Isabella Clark, long-time volunteer, "retired." We could always count on 
her cataloging skills on Tuesday afternoons. Thanks for your help, Isabella! 
Volunteers: 

Eleanor Bassett 



59 



Pat Clark 

Edith GImpel 

Sylvia WItherel I 

Barbara Ralston 

Dale Tucker 

Isabella Clark 

Arietta Paul 

Peter Lambert 

Benjamin Lambert 

Richard Ziegler 
A special thanks must go out to the Friends of Ossipee Public Library for their efforts 
during the year. The on-going book sale in the Library's "Bookcellar" is 
enthusiastically attended each month. The Friends have sold carnations, plants and 
have run a successful Bake/Book/Raffle sale. The Friends pose as elves at the 
holiday season by decorating the Library, inside and out. Their support is an 
invaluable resource to the Library in many ways. 
CIRCULATION STATISTICS 



Adult Fiction 


6296 


Adult Non-fiction 


2605 


Youth Fiction 


4661 


Youth Non-fiction 


1697 


Videos 


1409 


Magazines 


499 


Audios 


332 


Realia 


1 


Records 


4 


Total Circulation: 


1 7,504 This reflects an increase of 1 6% over 1 994 


Reference questions 


810 


Nev^ patrons 


309 


"Article Express" 


6 


Inter-Library Loans 




To O.P.L. 


129 


From O.P.L. 


33 


Not filled 


47 




FINANCIAL STATEMENT 


RECEIPTS 




Balance Forwarded 


$5,122.37 


Town of Ossipee 


$19,995.00 


Gov. Wentworth Arts Council 200.00 ($100 for '96) 


Refund from Highsm 


lith 74.00 


TOTAL RECEIPTS 


20,269.06 


TOTAL SALARIES 


40,057.25 



60 



EXPENDITURES 






Salaries 


$40,057.25 




Fuel 


1,771.98 




Books 


8,273.34 




Periodicals 


366.60 




Videos 


547.88 




Water & Sewer 


464.00 




Dues 


140.00 




Telephone 


1,212.21 




Miscellaneous 


55.80 




Programs 


419.57 




Postage 


62.40 




Maintenance and Repair 


2,141.41 




Furniture 


502.00 




Supplies 


710.96 




MILEAGE 


281.88 




Electricity 


2,285.00 




Savings Account Expense 


13.08 




TOTAL EXPENDITURES 




$60,201.06 


BALANCE IN CHECKING ACCOUNT 


as of 12/31/95 


$5,247.06 



SAVINGS (Fundraising Account) 

RECEIPTS 

Balance forwarded $5,243.23 

Interest 150.62 

Donations 45.00 

Fines 54.10 

Fund Raising Activities 1,282.50 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $6,775.45 

EXPENDITURES 00.00 00.00 

BALANCE IN ACCOUNT 1 2/31/95 $6,775.45 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lindalee M. Lambert, Library Director 
Eileen B. Leavitt, Chairman, Board of Trustees 
Catherine D. Zlegler, Secretary, Board of Trustees 
Mary Buswell, Treasurer, Board of Trustees 
Susan Day, Board of Trustees 
Elizabeth S. Rouner, Board of Trustees 



61 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 

For the first time in the history of Ossipee, men became the minority on the Board 
of Selectmen when Sandra "Sam" Martin joined Joe Skehan and Pat Jones. 

This year Ossipee went on line with Enhanced 91 1 . This was a cooperative 
effort of all involved at Town Hall. Especially Jojo Belville; we thank her for her 
dedication to her job and Town once again. Also, a big "thank you" to our local 
post offices and their dedication to this project. And last but not least, to all the 
citizens of Ossipee who have put up their numbers. 

The Ossipee Water Project is well under way. The wells are in and the initial 
testings show good quantity and quality of water. The remainder of the project — 
pipes, storage tank, and meters — will be started this spring with a completion date 
of June 30, 1996. 

Construction and paving on Elm Street have made a tremendous improvement 
In the road. It will receive a one-inch coating of asphalt In the spring. This year 
Moultonvllle Road will be the focus of road improvement. 

The new rescue vehicle is now housed at the Center Ossipee Fire Station. The 
squad is constantly upgrading Its equipment and expertise. The Selectmen are 
grateful for all their efforts and the efforts of the advisory committee. 

The Selectmen have fine tuned an Outdoor Ordinance to be in compliance 
with state laws and to ensure the public safety. The Ordinance is designed to 
ensure public events are held safely. 

The Selectmen are meeting once a mc^'- with interested employees to 
Improve communications and cooperation. The Selectmen are working on job 
descriptions for all employees. A new three-year contract has been agreed upon by 
employees and Selectmen. 

The recycling center and Incinerator now has an oil recycling storage tank for 
the home mechanic to dispose of waste oil in an environmentally safe manner. 
There Is a new sign at the facility entrance. Thanks to everyone's cooperation, the 
amount of recycled material is Increasing. 

The cleanup of unsightly properties is continuing. The Zoning Board of 
Adjustment, Planning Board, Selectmen, and Code Enforcement Officer are 
working together to update our Zoning Ordinance and to more effectively enforce 
It. 

Peter Waugh, our new Recreation Director, has a new office in the 
completely renovated old warming hut. He has enthusiastically developed and 
carried out programs for all ages. He has done a great job on publicity for the 
programs. Peter and his family have been warmly welcomed by the community. 
Carry on the good work, Peter! 

The handicapped accessible bathroom Is installed in the town hall. The rest of 
the project, including doorway and ramp, will be completed this year. 



62 



We would also like to thank Representative Randy Lyman for all her 
dedication and hard work on the Folsom Brook project. Her resignation has been 
accepted with regret. 

We hope that all will get behind this project in the future and try to carry on 
the work Randy has struggled to accomplish so far. 

Sincerely, 
The Selectmen 



63 



OSSIPEE POLICE DEPARTMENT 
1995 Annual Report 

1995 was a year of tremendous growth for this department. In April we added Jeff 
Brown as our newest full-time officer. This was made possible by a $75,000 three- 
year federal grant. As a result, we began 24-hour patrol this summer. This has 
proven to be a tremendous step in providing emergency help to our citizens. That 
officer , out there in the middle of the night, is able to render aid faster than ever 
before, and not only in criminal matters, but for medical aid calls, right down to 
assisting stranded motorists. 

It became very clear how beneficial this was, when within two weeks of 
adding the midnight shift. Officers Ruel and Willard rescued a man from an 
overturned boat on Duncan Lake. We have wonderful fire and rescue personnel, 
and while their response time is often amazing, those few minutes in the middle of 
the night can truly mean the difference between life and death in emergencies 
such as this, heart attacks, etc. 

This past year was also very busy, with this department logging over 108,000 
miles on the three cruisers. We answered over 3,400 incidents and made 190 
criminal arrests. 

I would like to both professionally and personally thank each and every 
member of this department for their continued service to the Town of Ossipee. 

Thank you to the police agencies around us for their help and assistance, to 
the fire departments, rescue squad, and Lord's Ambulance for their help at 
emergency scenes, to the Office Staff at Town Hall, and to all of the residents, who 
continue to support us through kind words and deeds. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Richard H. Morgan 
Chief of Police 

ACTIVITY 1995 

Suicides 1 Unattended Deaths 3 

Attempted Suicides 6 Simple Assault 47 

Harassment 3 Arson 3 

Burglary 31 Attempted Burglary 12 

Shoplifting 5 Thefts 106 

Vehicle Thefts 5 Forgery 2 

Bad Checks 4 Rec. Stolen Property 1 

Criminal Mischief 6 Attempted Criminal Mischief ... 1 02 

Possession Drugs 4 Indecent Exposure 2 

Child Neglect 3 Violation Court Order 1 

Family Offenses 6 False Report 1 



64 



Escape 1 

Probation Violation 2 

Firing Weapon 5 

Harassing Phone Calls 30 

Intoxication 25 

DWI 18 

Evading 1 

Open Container 1 1 

Traffic Citations 86 

Criminal Trespass 1 7 

Neighbor Disputes 13 

Assist other Agency 1 08 

Assist Medical Aid 81 

illegal Alcohol 17 

Assist Citizens 102 

Susp. PersonA^ehicIe 140 

Welfare Checks 25 

Incidents 130 

Other 466 



Perjury 1 

Concealed Weapon 1 

Threatening with Weapon 4 

Disorderly Conduct 3 

Hit and Run 1 

Reckless Driving 3 

Suspended License 9 

Traffic Warnings 391 

Vehicle Accidents 1 1 7 

Family Fights 32 

Noise Complaints 70 

Assist Fire Department 55 

Juvenile runaways 23 

Juvenile Offenses 20 

Stranded Motorist 1 1 

Abandoned Vehicles 35 

Business Security Check 862 

Paper Service 99 



TOTAL ACTIVITY 3468 



ARRESTS 

Possession Drugs 4 

Resisting Arrest 2 

DWI 18 

Protective Custody.... 32 

Open Container 13 

Rec. Stolen Property 1 

Criminal Mischief 6 

Disobeying an Officer 1 

Criminal threat 4 

Transporting Alcohol 2 

Indecent Exposure 2 

Warrants 4 

Disorderly Conduct 2 

Miscellaneous 1 

TOTAL 



1995 

Simple Assault 28 

Violation Court Order 1 

illeg. Possession of Alcohol.. 16 

Suspended License 9 

Theft 4 

Shoplifting.,. 2 

Unauthorized Use 1 

1 st Degree Assault 1 

Criminal Trespass 18 

Illegal Fire 10 

Littering 1 

Reckless Operation 1 

Felon with Firearm 1 

Child Sexual Assault 4 

190 



65 



REPORT OF THE OSSIPEE RESCUE SERVICE 

The Osslpee Rescue Service has once again had a very busy year. The Service 
responded to 346 tones in 1995, up from 291 in 1994. These calls ranged from 
calls for medical aid, fire assist, and service calls, as well as standby duty at special 
events. 

We took delivery of our nev^ rescue ambulance in April, and it has been of 
great use at all types of calls. We look forv^ard to many years of topnotch service 
with this truck. 

We also took delivery of a new set of Hurst Extrication Equipment In May. 
The Service has been training with all three fire departments on the use of these 
tools, and we have had to use them at accidents here in Ossipee, as well as in 
Wolfeboro, on several occasions. 

Finally, the Service has grown from 12 members to 23 this last year. We now 
have 4 members certified as EMT-lntermediate and now carry advanced life 
support equipment on our rescue ambulance. 

We wish to take this opportunity to thank each and every citizen of Ossipee 
for their overwhelming support of our volunteer efforts. 

Yours in Service, 
Paul D. Jay, Captain 
Ossipee Rescue Service 



66 



TIMBER/CONSERVATION MONITOR 
1 995 Activity Report 

The fiscal tax year for timber products is from the first of April through March 31; 
therefore, statistics reflect this time span. I would also advise that these figures are 
NOT exact, since many of them are compiled from the notice of intent to cut 
timber (which is an estimate). The reports of timber cut are supposed to be EXACT. 
Reports are required to be filed within 60 days of completion of the operation or 
March 31, whichever comes first. However, the timber industry, not being an 
exact science, we depend on the honesty and integrity of those filing the report. 

This report will be submitted before the end of the fiscal year; therefore, it 
cannot reflect accurate, final statistics. 

1) Notice of Intent to Cut Timber, and Supplements on file to date are 75. 

2) The acreage cut is 3274.22. (Note: this figure does not mean clear cut, but 
simply the number of acres from which timber was taken. 

3) The board feet of timber cut by species: 

SPECIES ESTIMATED AMOUNT CUT 

White Pine 2,225,047 bf 

Hemlock 332,275 bf 

Red Pine 99,61 5 bf 

Spruce & Fir 173,835 bf 

Hard Maple 1 05,000 bf 

White Birch 1 19,845 bf 

Yellow Birch 1 28,040 bf 

Oak 964,440 bf 

Ash 1 87,394 bf 

Beech & Soft Maple 248,345 bf 

Pallet or Tie Logs 280,718 bf 

Other: Aspen 435 bf 

Poplar 405 bf 

Black Birch 5,000 bf 

PULPWOOD TONS CORDS 

Spruce & Fir 30.00/4,185.00 

Hardwood & Aspen 3,335.59/2,684.13 

Pine 626.84/2,337.01 

Hemlock 6,037.00/757.98 

Whole Tree Chips 6,647.74/00.00 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Birch Bolts 10 cords 

Cordwood & Fuelwood 388 cords 



67 



4) Personal Use/Exempt 24,200 bf White Pine 

10,000 bf Maple 

5,800 bf Oak 

1 54 cords fuelwood 

5) Activity: 

Complaints 4 

Boundary Disputes 2 

Warnings Issued ...2 

Summons Issued 26 

Criminal Investigations 7 

During 1995 there was a recodification of State Laws pertaining to Forest and 
Lands. "A Guide to the Forest Laws of New Hampshire" is available from the 
Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests at a fee of $20 per copy. This 
publication is very well done and is definitely worth the $20. 

If we can be of service to you, the residents of Ossipee, please contact us 
through the Selectmen's Office, telephone #: 539-41 81 . 

Respectfully submitted, 
John E. Smith 
Timber Monitor 



68 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COUNCILOR 

TO THE CITIZENS OF DISTRICT ONE 

As Executive Councilor for District One, it is a privilege for me to communicate 
with the citizens of this town and area, which are part of District One of 98 towns 
and four cities. 

The five-member Executive Council is at the top of your Executive Branch of 
government. The NH House and Senate make laws and pass into law a budget. It 
is then the constitutional and \awiu\ duty of the Governor and Council to carry out 
those laws and budget. The entire Judicial Branch of judges are all nominated by 
the Governor and confirmed by the Council. The Governor and Council also 
nominate and confirm 267 Commissioners and Directors to terms of office in the 
various state executive branch departments. 

The Governor and Executive Council also are required by law to nominate 
and confirm dozens of citizens to various volunteer boards and commissions. If 
anyone is interested in serving, they should forward their resume directly to 
Governor Merrill or my office at the State House. A list of these boards and 
commissions may be obtained by calling my State House office at 271-3632. 

The year ahead will prove challenging in the area of town, county, and state 
administration of the recently passed House Bill 32, which reallocates, reorganizes 
most of the Health and Human Services Department of NH State Government. It is 
extremely important that local and county officials stay in close touch with their 
State Senators and State Representatives. I have asked Health and Human Services 
Commissioner Terry Morton to appoint at least 15-20 people from each county to 
act as advisors to this office as commission. If any of you are interested in serving, 
please call his office direct 1-800-852-3345 ext. 4331 or send him a note at his 
office on Hazen Drive, Concord, NH 03301 expressing your interest. 

As of this writing there is still about $270,000 waiting to be matched by local 
dollars in the Economic Development Matching Grant Program and $275,000 
waiting to be matched in the Joint Tourist Promotional Program. Both of these 
programs can be accessed by calling 271-241 1 . 

Some nine million dollars is waiting at the Office of State Planning (tel. no. 
271-21 55) in the Community Development Block Grant Program. A town, county, 
regional economic development council, or other regional group is eligible to 
apply. 

The Governor's Advisory Commission on Intermodal Transportation has 
submitted our recommendation to the Governor on various projects submitted to 
us by towns and regional planning commissions. It is now up to the Governor to 
submit his recommendations to the House and Senate by February 15, 1996, and 
then it's up to those two bodies of state government as to the final disposition of 
the plan. I don't look for much In the way of new highways, bridges, and 



69 



transportation projects due mainly to lack of money. Hopefully, we'll be able to 
keep in good repair the transportation system we've got. 

It is amazing the advice and technical assistance available in State 
Government to citizens, businesses, and local municipalities. The Office of 
Industrial Development has a very attractive brochure listing technical, financial, 
and community resources available for the asking by calling 271 -241 1 . 

Should my office be of help in matters relating to the Executive Branch, please 
know that I welcome the opportunity to respond. It is a pleasure to serve you. 

Raymond S. Burton 

State House - Room 207, Concord, NH 03301 

Office - 603-271 -3632 - Home - 603-747-3662 



70 




TRKOUIMTY 
COMMUIMITY ACTION 

Serving Coos, Carroll & Grafton Counties 



To the residents of Ossipee: 

The Community Action Program (CAP) has been providing services to Ossipee 
from its Folsom Road location for the past ten years. Our client case load has 
increased greatly; hov^ever, our dedicated staff and volunteers continue to v^ork 
v^ith area needs. 

Welfare reform, so v^idely discussed on TV daily, had its impact on all social 
service agencies, and CAP is no exception. We have felt the cutbacks, but have 
continued to v^ork with problems facing our community in homelessness, lack of 
jobs, linking clients to other services, providing necessary information, and 
v^orking vc'ith all social agencies on behalf of Ossipee residents. 

Ossipee received $108,479.20 in dollar value service this past year. 241 
households received fuel assistance, 82 were elderly; 1 1 households were 
weatherized, assistance was given to homeless families, and USDA food was 
distributed to food pantries, to name a few services. 

We continue to provide direct service to the Ossipee Welfare Department. 
This past year we worked with town officials and clients to build a better Ossipee 
by helping clients help themselves. We work daily with this project. 

We can't thank our dedicated staff and volunteers enough for their continued 
team effort for the benefit of all. 

We appreciate your support in the past and look forward to assisting with 
some of the needs of Ossipee in the coming year. 

Sincerely, 
Margie W. Vacca 
Belinda W.Cullen 



71 



OSSIPEE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
ANNUAL REPORT, 1995 

The Ossipee Historical Society is a non-profit organization which has two primary 
goals: to perpetuate the memory of the citizens and the history of Ossipee by 
acquiring and preserving materials which have to do with the life of our town from 
its beginnings; and to promote an awareness, understanding and appreciation of 
our town's history through collections and public programs. 

This past September, the OHS celebrated its 75th anniversary, which was just 
one of the highlights of a very busy and successful year. 

Early in 1 995, the OHS and the Greater Ossipee Area Chamber of Commerce 
collaborated on the writing of a grant request. As a result, $1500 was received 
from the N.H. Humanities Council and Inherit New Hampshire to develop a 
permanent walking tour of Center Ossipee. 

On July 1, 1995, author/historian Edward M. Cook, Jr. led the first walking 
tour, accompanied by 75 interested people. A brochure and plaques at each of the 
sites along the way mean that the walk is self-guided, but Ted Cook's commentary 
certainly made the very first walk a most memorable one. It kicked off Old Home 
Week and promoted 1995's theme of "Pride in Our Past, Faith in Our Future." 

During the month of July, the OHS displayed portraits and photographs of 
past citizens who made significant contributions to Ossipee's history. The 
collection and a group of posters from our past which was also on display, were 
well received. 

The Granite Day celebration in August was truly a time of celebration, as the 
Early Settlers' Meeting House was officially entered in the National Register of 
Historic Places on June 1 2, 1 995. 

OHS president Doris Ashton wrote the "Museum Guide" for Grant Hall in 
1995. Grant Hall is the Society's Museum, which was open Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays during July and August. Curator Arietta Paul and members of the 
OHS were kept very busy caring for collections, displaying artifacts, talking with 
visitors and cataloging more than 25 new acquisitions. 

Program Chairman Ginny Bradley, following the Society's 1995 theme of 
"Ossipee People," arranged several very interesting programs. Archeology records, 
early cemetery records and a group of Native Americans helped us understand our 
distant past, while a Civil War Exhibit and speakers who provided in-depth 
biographies of Ossipee notables, brought more recent history alive. There was also 
a picnic in the Ossipee Mountains and other trips to round out a wonderful year. 

Other highlights of 1995 included a new coat of paint for Grant Hall, the 
finalizing of a boundary line agreement with the First Congregational Church of 
Center Ossipee, a blue ribbon for the OHS float in the Old Home Week parade 
(thanks to the efforts of Rachel Ward), and a yard sale. 



72 



OHS publishes a regular newsletter for Its membership. Editor Lorraine 
Borgatti also does a lot of photography for the Society. 

Future plans for the OHS include working with students in the public schools. 
Members hope to work with Ossipee's fourth-graders and with junior high school 
history classes to encourage students to appreciate and to become involved with 
local history through oral histories, adopt-a-cemetery programs, video records, 
genealogical searches and other activities. 

The Ossipee Historical Society is proud of its contributions and its continuing 
efforts to preserve Ossipee's past. Although the Society Is small by most standards, 
it has a dedicated core of hard-working people, several of whom are well trained 
in the technical skills needed to care for and preserve the wide range of materials 
acquired. Our membership and acquisitions continue to grow, and we look 
forward to the future. We invite anyone interested in Ossipee's past, present and 
future to join us and/or to add to the museum's collections. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Doris Ashton, President 



73 



OSSIPEE PLANNING BOARD 

1995 ANNUAL REPORT 

This was the first year that the Planning Board functioned as an elected Board, and 
it was a smooth transition. The Board met regularly on the first and third Tuesdays 
at 7:00 p.m. at the Ossipee Town Hall, with additional meetings or work sessions 
held as necessary. 

During 1995 the Board granted sixteen site plan approvals under the new site 
plan review ordinance. The Board also approved six subdivisions and six 
boundary line adjustments. Two special use permits and one excavation permit 
were granted. Four plans of land were accepted. 

It has been the goal of the Board to work with the applicants, using such 
means as preliminary meetings, to make the process less complicated and more 
expedient. Although the requirements remain the same, the procedure has 
improved for both parties. 

The Board continues to strive to increase communication between our Board, 
the Zoning Board of Adjustment, the Code Enforcement Officer, and the 
Selectmen. By working together we are able to better serve the community as well 
as the applicants. 

Planning Board Members: ' 

Gilbert C, Adams, Jr., Chairman - Term expires 1998 
Milton Dow, Vice-chairman - Term expires 1998 
Patricia Jones, Selectmen's Representative 
George Lynch - Term expires 1 996 
Boyd "Bucky" Parker - Term expires 1997 
James Rines - Term expires 1 996 
John Swanson - Term expires 1997 
Warren Harrington, Alternate - Term expires 1998 
Gregory Howard, Alternate - Term expires 1 998 
Ray Leavitt, Secretary (Non-member) 



74 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 
1995 Annual Report 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment functioned under the leadership of Mark 
McConkey and Vice-Chairman David Babson Jr. The function of the ZBA is to 
interpret the intent of the Ossipee Zoning Ordinance, and has the authority to act 
on appeals of administrative decisions, approve special exceptions, and grant 
variances. 

In addition to ansu'erlng numerous zoning questions, the Board held 30 
public hearings and attended four municipal \aw lectures. 

The ZBA meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:00 pm. All those 
v^ith questions are encouraged to join us at our regularly scheduled meeting. 

Our appreciation is extended to those who, during 1995, have served our 
community on the Zoning Board of Adjustment. 

Mark McConkey, Chairman 
David L. Babson jr. Vice-Chairman 
Sandra Martin 
Stanley Brothers 
Joseph Deighan 
James McKinnon 
Paul Wickwire 
Chester Schmeelk 



75 



REPORT OF THE CODES ENFORCEMENT OFFICER 

The following is the Codes Enforcement Officer's Annual Report for the year 
ending December 31, 1995: 

Building/Zoning Permits issued 89 each 

Building Permit fees paid to Town $2,225.00 

Sign Permits issued 1 2 each 

Total Correspondence issued 212 letters 

Violations of Ordinances cited 57 letters 

Denial of Building/Zoning Permit 22 letters 

Failed Septic System cited 1 letter 

Substandard living conditions, inspected 2 cases 

The majority of the permit denials were later rescinded and permits issued as 
the result of subsequent appeals to the Zoning Board of Adjustment and its 
issuance of Special Exceptions, Variances, or other appropriate relief. 

Most of the violations were corrected by appropriate corrective action by the 
property owners involved, however there remain ten outstanding violations which 
are in various states of negotiation, appeals, or corrective action. A "fining" 
process has been established by the Board of Selectmen which will be used in the 
immediate future to aid in the enforcement of the Town's Ordinances when all 
other reasonable attempts to seek compliance fail. 

As requested, meetings of the Board of Selectmen, Planning Board, and 
Zoning Board of Adjustment were attended for testimony and to discuss violations 
and other matters related to the Town's Ordinances. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Maurice H. O'Donnell 
Codes Enforcement Officer 



76 



LAKES REGION PLANNING COMMISSION 
1995 ANNUAL REPORT 

The Lakes Region Planning Commission Is a voluntary, non-profit association of 
local governments formed for the purpose of bringing area municipalities together. 
By associating and pooling resources, local governments have access to a highly 
trained professional staff for a v^lde variety of services. The LRPC v^orks to benefit 
the member communities and the region overall. The LRPC has expertise in land 
use and transportation planning, master planning, environmental planning, capital 
improvement programming, economic and community development, housing, 
fiscal and environmental Impact analysis, geographic information systems, 
household hazardous waste collections, engineering and site plan review. Circuit 
rider planning and public facilitation services are also available from the 
Commission. 

Your support helps the LRPC maintain a regional presence working on behalf 
of all local governments in the Lakes Region. Over the past year the LRPC: 

• Provided consultation and technical assistance to thirty-one member 
communities. 

• Met repeatedly with federal and state officials and agency representatives to 
Influence policy and help keep the Region an active participant in many ongoing 
programs. 

• Contracted and coordinated the 1 1th, and largest, regional household hazardous 
waste program In the Lakes Region, serving over twenty municipalities In a one- 
day super collection. 

• Prepared an analysis for a permanent or semi-permanent household hazardous 
waste facility In the Lakes Region. 

• Sponsored the fall sessions of the N.H. Law Lecture Series. 

• Served as Board Member to the Belknap County Economic Development 
Council and the Newfound Economic Development Corp. Mitigation Advisory 
Committee. 

• Convened two public participation meetings for the Route 16 corridor study 
from the seacoast to Errol, NH, in coordination with the N.H. Dept. of 
Transportation and three other regional planning commissions. Completed 
extensive transportation and data collection efforts for the study. 

• Completed a display map of several sites in the Lake Winnlpesaukee watershed 
for the benefit of the Lakes Region Heritage Tourism Roundtable through the 
Scenic Byways program. 

• Awarded a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the N.H. 
Department of Environmental Services to continue technical assistance and 
publicity efforts for the Lake Winnlpesaukee Watershed Project. 

• Continued to follow up on efforts to locate a conference facility or multi-use 
convention center in the Lakes Region. 



77 



• Participated in other regionally significant economic development efforts 
including Governor's State Park Advisory Committee, Ossipee Valley Chamber of 
Commerce, and the Franklin Economic Development and Revitalization 
Committee. 

• Supported and staffed the Lakes Region transportation advisory committee as a 
forum to discuss and analyze the technical merits of transportation projects. 

• Assisted applicants applying for funding assistance from the Transportation 
Enhancements program. In cooperation with the Technical Advisory Committee, 
developed a list of prioritized enhancement projects for the Lakes Region. 

• Convened regional meetings in support of Department of Transportation efforts 
for the development of a statewide transportation model. 

• Completed a Tourism Profile of the Lakes Region; a statistical summary of the 
role tourism related activities have on the people and economy of the area. 

• The first annual "Celebrate Your Lakes Day" was held in Meredith, NH on 
August 12, 1995. This was created to promote water quality protection in a fun 
and informative setting. The activities, workshops, and displays presented 
information about issues affecting New Hampshire's lakes. 

• Published a book on the Historic Churches of Belknap County. 

We look forward to serving Ossipee in the future. Feel free to contact us at 
279-81 71 whenever we can be of assistance. 



78 



OSSIPEE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
1995 ANNUAL REPORT 

The Ossipee Conservation Commission functioned this year under the leadership 
of Chairman Peter OIkkola and Vice-chairman Ralph Buchanan. Other members 
are Frank Hammond, Maria LaCuardia, Randy Lyman, John Smith, and Ray Leavitt 
(alternate). 

Nine dredge and fill applications were processed through the New Hampshire 
Wetlands Board. 

Harvesting of timber from the town forest on Route 16 was completed, with 
the income from the sale of this timber being used for fuel assistance for Ossipee 
residents. Through the New Hampshire Department of Probation, a probationer 
gave 24 hours of community service for the final clean-up. The county extension 
service was so pleased with the project that they have erected a sign there. 

Information was made available to the public regarding attracting bluebirds, 
with a good response to the news release in local newspapers. 

The Commission sent two youngsters from the Ossipee Central School, Laura 
Jewell and Melissa Breton, to the Barry Conservation Camp in Berlin. Sponsored 
jointly by LJNH Cooperative Extension and NH Fish and Game, this camp is 
geared toward youths who have an interest In the outdoors and in becoming 
responsible outdoor users. 

The Commission entered a float In the July 4th parade, winning first prize in 
the non-profit category. Alex Troy appeared on the float with some of his animal 
mounts. The float was designed by Maria LaGuardia. 

The Ossipee Conservation Commission meets on the second Wednesday of 
each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Town Hall in Center Ossipee. All meetings are 
open to the public, and your participation is encouraged. The Commission Is a 
member of the New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions. 



79 



OSSIPEE OLD HOME WEEK 
1995 Annual Report 

In only its second year, Ossipee Old Home Week was again a tremendous 
success. The week-long schedule of events were well attended and generated a 
great deal of enthusiasm. 

The Fourth of July Parade and Fireworks has proven to be the crown jewels of 
the week. This year's parade was excellent, under the ever-present and helpful 
leadership of our local VFW, Post 8270. This year we increased the amount spent 
on fireworks to over seven thousand dollars, and anyone who saw them must 
agree that the display was nothing short of awesome. This year, it was estimated 
that nearly four thousand people attended the fireworks at Constitution Park, with 
untold additional numbers watching from boats and property around the lake. 

This year, we spent a total of nearly fourteen thousand dollars on Old Home 
Week, and every last penny was raised through the hard work of the committee 
and the generous donations of too many people to list is this report. We were able 
to meet all expenses and had over two thousand left to kick off nest year's 
festivities. 

As I write this report, plans are well under way for Old Home Week 1996, 
and we fully expect to keep making this week better and better. The Ossipee Old 
Home Week Committee is now a registered non-profit organization, and we 
welcome anybody and everybody who wants to work with us to come to the 
meetings and get involved. This organization is non-political and exists simply to 
promote community pride. 

As Chairman, I would like to thank all the members of the committee who, 
through hard work and longs hours, have made this a success. Thank you to all the 
businesses and organizations who have participated in the events. A special thank 
you to those who have opened their hearts and their wallets to support what we 
have been doing, and thank you to the Board of Selectmen, and town workers 
who have been so very helpful. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Richard H. Morgan 
Chairman 



80 



RECREATION DIRECTOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 
FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1995 

To the Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Osslpee: 

1995 has been a year of change for the Ossipee Recreation Department. 

Since accepting the position of Recreation Director in late June, I have been 
busy meeting people, planning programs, and enjoying the beauty of Osslpee. 

The Ossipee Recreation Department is a member of the: National Recreation 
and Parks Association, American Park and Recreation Society, National Youth 
Sports Coaches Association, New Hampshire Parks and Recreation Association, 
and the Carroll County Recreation Director's Association. Membership in these 
organizations provides resources and Input on a national and local basis. I am 
actively involved with the New Hampshire Parks and Recreation Association and 
the Carroll County Recreation Director's Association. 

The Department has also developed programs in cooperation with the Mt. 
Cranmore Sports Center, Purity Spring Resort, Kwoon Karate Academy, Carroll 
County YMCA, and Nancy Kelly Breton School of Dance. These cooperative 
ventures have been a benefit both to the department and to the respective 
businesses and organizations. 

A programs brochure has also been developed. This serves as a handy 
resource for people to see what programs and services are available. The brochure 
Is published quarterly and is available at many locations In town. 

The Ossipee Recreation department offers a wide variety of quality activities 
for all ages, designed to meet the needs of the community. The department's goal 
is to encourage healthy, active use of your leisure and recreation time. To that 
end, here Is a list of the activities available through the Department from July 1 to 
December 31. 

CHILDREN/YOUTH 

Summer Day Camp (Ages 6-1 2) 

Youth Soccer (Grades 1-6) 

Flag Football (Grades 3-6) 

Dance (Ages 3-1 2) 

Boys' "A" Travel Basketball (Grades 4-6) 

Boys' "B" Travel Basketball (Grades 4-5) 

Girls' Travel Basketball (Grades 4-6) 

Hot Shots I Instructional Basketball (Grades 1-2) 

Hot Shots 11 Instructional Basketball (Grades 3-4) 

Floor Hockey (Grades 5-6) 

Gymnastics (Ages 5-1 2) 

Squeaky Sneakers (Ages 1 8m-3) 

Crafty Critters (Ages 3-5) 



81 



Ice Skating 








Hockey 








Karate 








Cheerleading 


(Grades 4-6) 






TEENS 






ADULTS 


Aerobics 




Aerobics 


Open Gym 


Karate 




Fleet Feet 


Hockey 


Open Gym 




Karate 


Ice Skating 


Ice Skating 




Oil Painting 


Water Aerobics 


Hockey 




Line Dancing 
Volleyball 




SPECIAL EVENTS 







Halloween Party (3-3 rd Grade) 

Halloween Dance (Grades 4-6) 

Turkey Shoot (All ages) 

Annual Fall Sports Banquet (Youth Soccer and Flag Football) 

Breakfast With Santa (3-3rd Grade) 

A special "Thank you" is extended to all coaches, referees, umpires, 
instructors, and volunteers who generously shared their time and expertise which 
greatly enhanced the quality of the activities and programs . . . without your help 
and guidance, the department could not accomplish what it does. I would like to 
show my deep appreciation to all of the businesses, individuals, civic groups, and 
organizations for their support of the Department's activities this past year. Your 
generosity has provided much-needed resources for the activities. Through your 
financial contributions and your individual effort many children have been able to 
participate in these activities. I would also like to thank "Sam" Martin for printing 
the brochure and Ernie Hayford for keeping the fields and gym in top-notch shape. 
Lastly, I thank all of you for making myself and my family feel welcome. It means a 
lot to us. 

If you have any questions about the Recreation Department, ideas for 
programs or activities, would like to volunteer in some way, or just want to chat, 
please stop by the office. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Peter Waugh 
Recreation Director 



82 



I 



OSSIPEE LAKE DAM AUTHORITY 

The Osslpee Lake Dam Authority has made tremendous progress again this year 
with the State of New Hampshire as our partners in the operation of the dam 
which controls Osslpee Lake. We have experienced heavy rains in both the 
summer and winter and through communications and cooperation with the State 
of New Hampshire, the Dam Authority, and local fire departments, the damage 
again was kept to a minimum. 

This was accomplished this past year through the replacement of the old broken 
and dilapidated gate system and building with brand new modern gate lifters and a 
brand new building to house new stop logs and new lifters. Also, on the 
downstream side we decided to install a walkway across the river to make the 
peninsula more accessible to fishermen and nature lovers. All this work was made 
possible with the hard work, determination, and cooperation with the Dam 
Authority and the State of New Hampshire. We look forward to another year with 
the State as our partners in the maintenance of our largest economic resource. 

Respectfully submitted, 
John P. PIcard, Chairman 



83 



OSSIPEE LAKE DAM AUTHORITY REPORT 

This is the fifth year of operations. There were four regular meeting as follows: 
January 11, 1995 in Ossipee July 19, 1995 in Ossipee 

April 1 2, 1 995 in Freedom October 6, 1 995 at the Dam 



1994 Remaining Balance 






$24,453.57 


1995 Appropriations (Regular) 








Ossipee 




$2,800.00 




Freedom 




2,782.28 




Balance (Reflects overpayment by Ossipee of $35.85) 


$30,035.85 


1995 Appropriations (Special) 








Ossipee 




8,250.00 


38,285.85 


Freedom (Borrowed from Treasury) 


6,750.00 




Paid to Treasurer, State of NH 




15,000.00 


23,285.85 


Less Expenses 








NET/AI 1 monitoring circuits 




410.27 




Aleska Construction - Snow Plowing 


126.00 




Independent Publishing 




51.60 




NH Water Resource Council. - 


Gauge Op. 


1 




and Meter 




4,806.00 




PSNH Electricity 




141.15 




Skehan Home Center 




79.35 




Secretary/Treasurer Salary 




100.00 




Town of Freedom (Sec. Serv.) 




34.50 




Stamps 




35.28 




Larkin Welding 




45.00 




Red's Machine Co. 




45.00 




Bruce Fichter 




1,031.25 




State of NH Treasurer 




15,000.00 








$21,905.40 


$1,380.45 


INCOME 








Interest 




$291.73 


$1,672.18 


1996 Appropriations (Regular) 








Ossipee 




12,062.00 




Freedom 




9,515.82 




Freedom (Replace Loan) 




6,750.00 








$28,327,82 


$30,000.00 



Respectfully submitted, 
William O. Cutler, Sec/Treas. 



84 



REPORT OF THE DOG WARDEN 
1995 

Since January 1995 I have responded to 348 calls, traveling 3,931 miles, v^ith a 
total of 286 man hours, in the Town of Ossipee. Over all, 51 dogs were 
impounded, 1 1 bite cases with 1 1 quarantined dogs, 2 lost hunting dogs returned 
to their owner, and 3 dogs needing medical attention. There was one investigation 
into Cruelty to Animals, 25 Warrants for Civil Forfeiture (unlicensed dogs) served, 
and 8 Summons issued for nuisances, i.e., dogs running at large and barking dogs. 
There were no confirmed rabid dogs in the Ossipee area. 

Countless hours are involved in keeping an updated list of currently licensed 
dogs so if found they can be returned to their owners. It is required by law that any 
dog when outside wear a collar with current license tag attached. I have heard 
from many owners that the tags keep coming off. The "S" type hooks that come 
with tags apparently are at fault. A tip from the grape vine says that using a round 
type key ring, sold at the hardware store, keeps the tags securely in place. 

Yearly licensing will soon be here again; be sure to check your pet's rabies 
expiration date. Dog licenses expire April 30, 1996. Licenses may be obtained at 
the Town Hall prior to April 30, 1996. A pet not currently vaccinated and 
licensed, in a bite situation, could cost $2,500, plus Impoundment fees, plus any 
cost to the town. 

Leash Law. The Leash law says that owners shall have control of their 
dog/dogs at all times. It does not say that their dog/dogs must be leashed at all 
times. If a dog is with its owner and the owner calls it and it returns to them they 
have control over it. The key issue here is that the dog is with the owner; if the 
owner knowingly allows the dog to run free or leaves the area where the dog is 
known to be, then the owner is not in control of the dog. A dog off its premises, 
with no apparent owner present, is in violation. 

I would like to thank the citizens of Ossipee for their input and the employees 
of the Town of Ossipee for their support. I look forward to serving you to the best 
of my ability in the coming year. 

Sincerely, 
Jim Eicock 
Dog Officer 



85 



VNA-HOSPICE ANNUAL REPORT 

The Visiting Nurse Association of Wolfeboro and Vicinity, Inc. is better known to 
its friends as VNA-Hospice. During FY 1995, the VNA-Hospice has continued to 
grow at an unbelievable rate. The Agency's staff made 56.6% more total home 
visits this past year. Ossipee's increase was 87.1%. 

The following services were provided to residents of Ossipee between 
October 1, 1994 and September 30, 1995: 
Number of Recipients Receiving Services 1 20 
Home Care Visits Made 5,846 

Hospice Visits Made 486 

Flu Immunizations 201 

Child Health Program 80 patients 

School Children Immunized 74 

Besides Ossipee, the VNA-Hospice provides services to the residents of Alton, 
Brookfield, Effingham, Sandwich, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, Wolfeboro. We also 
help the VNA Agencies in Moultonboro and Tamworth to provide services to their 
residents. 

The VNA-Hospice is a non-profit, equal opportunity employer that now has 
90 employees. The staff includes Administration, Secretarial and Financial people 
as well as Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, Certified Nurses Aides, 
Occupation, Speech and Physical Therapists and Medical Social Workers. The 
Agency also utilizes many volunteers, both in the Agency office and in our 
patients' homes. The Agency could not function without them. 

The Agency has three major programs that are offered to it's service area, 
including our Home Health Care Program, our Maternal Child Health Program 
and our Hospice Program. The Hospice Program can now provide care to 
residents of Mountain View Nursing Home. We also offer Adult Health Clinics 
with related tests such as blood pressure, blood sugar levels and other related adult 
health issues. Flu immunizations clinics are set up every Fall throughout the 
service areas. Educational programs are provided on a wide variety of health issues 
to the public and health care professionals. Volunteer training is provided. A 
bereavement group Is now available for those who have lost a loved one. 

The Agency has been very active in preparing for the changes in health care 
at the Local, State and Federal Levels. We receive most of our funding from 
Medicare/Medicaid, other insurances, fees collected, and Grants from the NH 
Bureau of Maternal and Child Health. We are also very dependent on our 
donations and town appropriation funds which enable us to continue to provide 
non-refundable services to those patients who need them. 

The Board of Directors, the staff and I thank you for your continued support. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Marilyn A. Barba, MS, RN, CNA 
Executive Director 

86 



OSSIPEE CONCERNED CITIZENS, INC. 
Annual Report, 1995 

To the Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Ossipee, Ossipee Concerned 
Citizens, Inc. submits its Annual Report: 

"You only live once, but if you work it right, once is enough" 

(Fred Allen) 
Our sphere of service increases annually. Kitchen coordinators and crew have 
prepared 39,848 quality, non-commercial meals during the past year alone. The 
WiC staff has surpassed 1000 clients per month, and added nutritional and 
counseling programs in support of parent/child well-being. The Ossipee Crossings 
Child Care Center provides secure and educational child care to 17 children per 
hour per day — an increase from 1 3 at this same time last year. 

We have, in addition, fundraised over $18,000 — a figure greater than any 
year before, and necessary for the quality of service to survive. The list includes: 
Public Suppers, Catering, Weekly Whist Night, Lobster Boil, Spring Fling, Harvest 
Fair, and July 4th Celebration in conjunction with Old Home Week. The 
Community Christmas Fair, tree sales, and the generosity of donation of/for gifts 
and food made the Santa Project a happy occasion. Further, the "Coats for Kids" 
program increased its numbers to 723. OssipeeAVolfeboro Cleaners was busy dry- 
cleaning while OCC provided the distribution site. 

Further programs include: Free weekly blood pressure clinics with the 
VNA/Hospice of Southern Carroll County, annual flu/pneumonia shots, rabies 
clinic, and the CSF (Community Surplus Food) Program for WiC participants and 
102 eligible seniors. 

Federal budget cuts have forced a philosophy of "integration of services" at the 
state and local levels — a methodology adopted several years ago by OCC, and one 
which may ultimately protect us from any major budget cuts. We continue to 
contract with the Division of Health and Human Services (DBAS) and the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture (USDA) for our primary sources of funding. Client 
donations, fundraising, and town support complete the budget for the agency. 

"One volunteer is better than ten forced men." 

(Unknown) 

The value of volunteerism cannot be easily measured. It may be stated accurately, 

however, that our sphere of service would be greatly reduced if not for the many 

forms of contributions given so generously. 

On behalf of the Board of Directors and Staff of OCC, i wish to express my 
sincere thanks to the citizens of the Town of Ossipee for your support throughout 
the years. Respectfully submitted, 

Donna E. Sargent 
Executive Director 
Ossipee Concerned Citizens, Inc. 



87 







WELFARE 








ANNUAL REPORT, 1995 








Quarter 








1 


2 


3 


4 


Total 


Housing 












& Shelter 


$2,001.78 


$1,264.50 


$00.00 


$1,532.07 


$4,798.35 


Electric 


152.00 


1,763.98 


461.57 


728.76 


3,106.31 


Heat 


205.48 


108.00 


23.19 


389.16 


725.83 


Medical 


211.30 


00.00 


1 70.70 


410.68 


792.68 


Food 


25.00 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


25.00 


Gasoline 


00.00 


15.75 


10.00 


20.00 


45.75 


Burial 


1,114.00 


00.00 


00.00 


00.00 


1,114.00 


TOTALS 


$3,709.56 


$3,152.23 


$665.46 


$3,080.67 


$10,607.92 



The town places Liens upon recipient assets whenever possible. This year 
$900.81 in liens was placed. 

This year $2,656.36 in repayments was made to the town. The bulk of these 
repayments were made when assets were sold and the liens satisfied. 



88 



ANNUAL REPORT 
OSSIPEE WATER & WASTEWATER DEPARTMENT 

1980-1995 

To the Board of Selectmen & Citizens of Ossipee: 

This year started off with changes in the water rate system, increasing the 
water base charges from $120 to $148 annually. This increase was brought about 
by needed funds to address the interest payments for the 1 .8 million bank note for 
the water improvement projects. 

Over the last two years, the Department mails out approximately 60-70 shut- 
off notices each quarter for delinquent accounts. The Department encourages 
customers to pay their water and sewer bills within the 30 day period offered. If 
paid within this 30 day period, no delinquent notice or penalty charge will be sent 
out, making better relations all around. If this issue is not understood, please call 
us for explanation or clarification. 

Water samples have been taken each month and tested at the State of N.H. 
Laboratory. The Town issued a boil order June 20th through 24th, 1 995 after being 
notified by the State Water Supply to do so. Testing accomplished on the 21 st-24th 
found the water safe, and the boil order was rescinded on Saturday, June 24, 1995. 

The Department has been reviewing Water Contracts 1-4, consisting of #1 
Well Contract, #2 Corrosion Control Facility and water mains, etc., #3 Water 
Storage Tank, and #4 Water Meters, etc. for specifications and bidding. Contract 
#1 went out to bid in 1995 and presently the wells have been drilled, flow tested, 
and water quality samples taken for analysis. The test results are coming In and 
show high quality drinking water. As all of the testing and results become available 
they can be made available to the public. 

Water Contracts #2, #3, and #4 were put out for bidding In January of 1996; 
shortly thereafter the Town will be awarding the low bidders for early spring 
construction start-ups. 

The Town, Water Department, and the Town's consultant, Hoyle, Tanner 
Associates, are working hard to meet the Federal Safe Drinking Water Rule 
mandate of June 29, 1 996. 

One way water customers can help the Town accomplish this project, when 
the time comes for meters to be installed, is by assisting and making good 
arrangements with the Town and Contractor doing this work in your homes and 
businesses. 

A water line project on Route 16 was completed this fall. The Water 
Department contracted to drill under Route 1 6 at the Southern end of the Ossipee 
bypass. An 8" water main was installed and presently Is in service feeding the 
southern end of the system. 

Year-end department personnel stands the same: a full-time Superintendent 
and two part-time — one bookkeeper/secretary, and one laborer/operator. 



89 



The wastewater system records 22 million gallons treated and pumped this 
year. Our water usage reports show 42.5 million gallons treated. 

The Superintendent reports cheerfully that no accidents befell department 
personnel during this period. 

in closing, the Department thanks all those supporting our mission and efforts, 
expecially the Town Offices that share our record-keeping responsibilities. 

The Superintendent personally thanks the two part-time employees for their 
endless efforts and service to the community. 

Roland Stockbridge 

Superintendent of Water /Sewer Department 



FROZEN WATER MAINS AND SERVICE LINE POLICY 
Effective 2/20/87 

Lines reported to be frozen during the normal workday: 

1 . An attempt to restore service during the same day vyill be made. If or when a 
backlog of several lines become frozen, the priority will be to thaw mains first and 
services thereafter. 

2. Frozen lines reported after 3:00 PM will be addressed the following morning 
even on Saturday, Sunday, or holidays. A genuine attempt to service customers of 
a first-call, first-service basis will be made. Exceptions to this policy can be made, 
and determined by the Department, when they are in the best interest of the 
system. 

Charges for restoration of a frozen service line: 

The Water Department is responsible for maintaining Its service line to the curb 
stop located just off the street. In cases where no curb stop exists, the Department 
will maintain the service to user's building, etc. However, at the next convenient 
time (Spring, etc.) a curb stop shall be Installed. When the line Is frozen In the 
street or the street side of the curb stop, no charge will be made to the customer. 

When determined by the Department that the service line is frozen beyond 
the curb stop but still In the ground, and thawing service is provided at the 
Department's expense, a charge may be made for that service. 

interior plumbing is a homeowner or customer condition, and the Department 
shall not be responsible for this. However, the Department may offer advice and/or 
assistance at the Department's discretion. 

All frozen water lines on this system will be handled under this policy. When 
conditions occur not covered In this policy, corrective measures will be 
determined by the Water Department. 



90 



WATER AND SEWER RATE SYSTEM 
Effective January 1 , 1 995 
WATER 
Type of Occupancy/Customer Base Rate Yearly (4 Outlets) 

Residence $148.00 

Business 178.00 

Hydrants (hydrants, standpipes, sprinklers) 238.00 

Laundromat (4 outlets per base rate charge) 228.00 

Schools (4 outlets per base rate charge) 1 78.00 

Churches (churches, halls) 148.00 

Resident Extra Outlet Charge, each 5.00 

Business Extra Outlet Charge, each 8.00 

SEWER (UNIT SYSTEM) 

Residence $190.00 

Business 225.00 

Churches (churches, halls) 190.00 

Schools (1 unit for reach ten people x rate) 225.00 

Laundromat (1 unit for three washers x rate) 225.00 

OUR OFFICE IS OPEN 8:00 TO 4:30 MONDAY-FRIDAY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS 

AT 8 DORE STREET 



91 



REPORT OF TOWN FOREST FIRE WARDEN 
AND STATE FOREST RANGER 

In calendar year 1 995, our three leading causes of fires were Children, Non-permit 
fires not properly extinguished, and Smoking Materials. 

Violations of RSA 224:27 II, the fire permit law, and the other burning laws of 
the State of New Hampshire are misdemeanors punishable by fines of up to 
$2,000 and/or a year in jail. Violators are also liable for all fire suppression costs. 

To aid your Forest Fire Warden, Fire Department, and State Forest Fire 
Officials, contact your local Warden or Fire Department to find out if a permit is 
required. This also helps to prevent unnecessary response to a controlled burn. 

1995 FIRE STATISTICS 

Forest Ranger Reported Fires 

Number of Fires for Cost Share Payment: 465 

Acres Burned: 437 

Suppression Cost: $147,000+ 

Lookout Tower Reported Fires: 555 
Visitors to Towers: 26,1 65 

Fires Reported by County 

Belknap 11 Hillsborough 71 

Carroll 50 Merrimack 49 

Cheshire 39 Rockingham 106 

Coos 17 Strafford 78 

Grafton 26 Sullivan 18 

Number of Fires Local Community 1 4 

Suppression Cost $4,875.57 

Local communities and the state share the cost of suppression on a 50/50 basis. 
The State of New Hampshire operates 15 fire towers, 2 mobile patrols, and 3 
contract aircraft patrols. This early detection and reports from citizens aid the 
quick response from the local fire department. 

''REMEMBER, ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT FOREST FIRES!" 

Lee Gardner Dana B. Cullen Sr. 

Forest Ranger Forest Fire Warden 



92 



OSSIPEE CORNER FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Annual Report, 1995 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 

Total calls for service: 1 27 

Total hours volunteered (calls, meetings, training): 2,751 .5 

Administrative hours (inspections, meetings, department operation): 1,638 

Structure Fires 1 4 Vehicle Fires 3 

Smoke Investigation 8 Special Service 1 

Vehicle Accidents 40 Brush Fires 9 

Wires/Trees Dovc'n 23 Bomb Threat 

Miscellaneous 1 7 CO Alarms 2 

Chimney Fires 2 Haz-Mat 5 

Alarm Activation 3 Mutual Aid Assist 24 

To: Ossipee Corner Light & Power Precinct Board of Commissioners & Residents: 

TRAINING 

Training for 1995 saw an average of 1 1 firefighters In attendance at training 
meetings with a total of 648.5 training man-hours. Training ranges from sessions 
with in-house instructors to having outside state certified instructors come in. 
Training sessions vary as much as our calls for service vary and include the 
required State and Federal mandated training. 

The purchase of the IFSTA training program was completed giving the 
department up-to-date videos & training guidebooks. In addition we also utilize 
the Mutual Aid resources for training materials through our neighboring 
departments. 

1995 we had three firefighters complete the Career Level course which brings 
the department certifications to the following: Firefighter Level 1 - 4, Career -7, 
Level II - 1, Instructor I - 1, EMT-B - 2, 1st Responder - 2. The results of the training 
makes our 24 hour a day, 365 day a year volunteer service extremely beneficial to 
the community that we serve. 

Respectfully, 
Keith Brown 
Deputy Chief/Training Officer 



1995 showed a slight increase in calls for service over the previous year. At year 
end the membership roster was 1 7 and 2 junior members. In 1995 the department 
was able to implement a program of physicals for the members in order to gather 



93 



baseline data as a preventative measure, which I see as a major accomplishment 
for the volunteer service. The dry hydrant project for Brown Ridge Road was 
completed with great success, bringing a water supply to the Ossipee Village area 
with year-round access. The water supply plan will continue this year and we 
hope to complete two projects. 

Deputy Brown and I reviewed the tax maps for the precinct In which we 
found properties that were not being taxed under the proper precinct. The errors 
were corrected which brought over $1 .5 million in valuation back to the precinct. 

A major purchase this year was a multi-gas monitor. This was accomplished 
with a substantial donation from a local business and a donation from our 
FIremens Association. 

I remain grateful to the membership for their commitment and dedication to 
the community and the challenge of today's volunteer fire service. Once again 
thank you to the residents of the precinct for your support. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mark Washburn 
Fire Chief 



94 



OSSIPEE CORNER LIGHT & POWER PRECINCT 


1 996 Proposed Budget 






1995 


1996 


4130 EXECUTIVE 






4130-01 Commissioners Reimbursement 


$900.00 


$900.00 


4130-02 Clerk Reimbursement 


300.00 


300.00 


4130-03 Precinct Miscellaneous 


500.00 


500.00 


4130-04 Legal Expenses 


400.00 


400.00 


TOTAL 41 30 


$2,100.00 


$2,100.00 


4150 FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 






4150-01 Treasurer's Reimbursement 


$300.00 


$300.00 


41 50-02 Treasurer Bonding 


125.00 


125.00 


TOTAL 4150 


$425.00 


$425.00 


4194 GENERAL GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS 






4194-01 Heating Oil 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


4194-02 Electricity 


1,000.00 


1,200.00 


4194-03 Snow Removal 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


4194-04 Furnace Maintenance 


100.00 


1 00.00 


4194-05 Septic Maintenance 


100.00 


100.00 


4194-06 General Maintenance 


1,800.00 


2,000.00 


TOTAL 4194 


$5,500.00 


$5,900.00 


4196 INSURANCE 






4196-01 Buildings 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


4196-02 Vehicles 


7,250.00 


6,500.00 


4196-03 Worker's Compensation 


850.00 


1,200.00 


4196-04 Error & Omissions 


150.00 


1 50.00 


TOTAL 4196 


$10,750.00 


$10,350.00 


4220 FIRE DEPARTMENT 






4220-01 Telephone 


$790.00 


$850.00 


4220-02 Fire Apparatus Fuel & Oil 


1,300.00 


1,150.00 


4220-03 Mutual Aid Dues 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


4220-04 Firefighter Reimbursement 


12,000.00 


12,500.00 


4220-05 Fire Chief's Expenses 


5,000.00 


5,200.00 


4220-06 Firefighter Expenses 


2,280.00 


2,500.00 


4220-07 Maintenance of Fire Apparatus 


2,800.00 


2,800.00 


4220-08 Maintenance of Communications 


500.00 


1,300.00 


4220-09 Maintenance of Fire Equipment 


900.00 


800.00 


4220-10 Firefighter Protective Gear 


2,000.00 


2,500.00 


4220-11 Training 


3,500.00 


2,500.00 



95 



4220-1 2 Water Supply 


4,000.00 


6,000.00 


4220-1 3 Expendable Trust 


00.00 


00.00 


4220-14 Occupation Health 


2,620.00 


2,500.00 


4220-1 5 Fire Prevention 


00.00 


200.00 


TOTAL 4220 


$39,690.00 


$42,800.00 


4316 HIGHWAY AND STREETS 






4316-01 Street Lighting 


$3,750.00 


$3,800.00 


TOTAL 4316 


$3,750.00 


$3,800.00 


4711 DEBT SERVICE 






471 1-01 Princ. Long Term Notes/Bonds 


$17,000.00 


$17,000.00 


4711-02 Int. Long Term Notes/Bonds 


8,000.00 


8,000.00 


TOTAL 4711 


$25,000.00 


25,000.00 


4902 CAPITAL OUTLAY 






4902-01 Fire Department 


$7,000.00 


$8,225.00 


4902-02 Buildings 


00.00 


00.00 


TOTAL 4902 


$7,000.00 


$8„225.00 


4915 CAPITAL RESERVE 






4915-01 Capital Reserve - Fire Apparatus 


$20,000.00 


$20,000.00 


TOTAL 4915 


$20,000.00 


$20,000.00 


TOTAL BUDGbl 


$114,215.00 


$118,600.00 


REVENUE TO OFFSET TAXES 


$2,097.00 


$3,000.00 


AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY TAXES 


$112,118.00 


$115,600.00 



1996 Amount to be paid by taxation Increased 3%. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Harry H. Pendarvis, Chairman 
Scott D. KInmond 
Douglas VanDyke 
Board of Commissioners 



96 



CENTER OSSIPEE FIRE PRECINCT 



Budget 



GOVERNMENT 
Executive 
Legal Expense 
General Government Building 



Insurance 



1995 

$9,750.00 

1 ,000.00 

22,870.00 

19,000.00 



1996 

9,750.00 

1,000.00 

21,100.00 

1 7,000.00 



PUBLIC SAFETY 
Fire Department 
Street Lights and Hydrants 
Principal, Long Term Bonds & Notes 
Interest, Long Term Bonds & Notes 
To Capital Reserve Fund 
Purchase New Fire Truck 

TOTAL BUDGET 



38,700.00 

23,300.00 

10,000.00 

7,610.00 

7,610.00 

1 60,000.00 



38,935.00 
23,300.00 
27,000.00 
12,366.00 
18,216.81 



$299,910.87 $150,451.00 



Calls 



False Alarm 03 

Bomb Threats 00 

Special Service Calls 15 

Mutual Aid Calls 31 

Station Stand-bys 03 

Smoke Investigations 06 

Fire Alarms 07 

Woods & Wild Fires 14 

Total calls were 119. 



Motor Vehicle Accident 1 1 

Wires and Fires 08 

Chimney Fires 02 

Miscellaneous Fires 07 

Haz-Mat Calls 05 

Structure Fires 04 

Vehicle Fires 03 



Respectfully submitted, 
Center Ossipee Fire Precinct 

Commissioners 
Edward Williams 
Edward Sullivan 
Robert Home 



97 



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100 



DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE TOWN OF OSSIPEE 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1995 



Date of 

Death Name Age 

02/03/95 Arata, Eugene A. 85 

06/01/95 Baker. Alice Anne 61 

12/26/95 Banfiford, Cora Hazel 94 

09/11/95 Baroski.Eva 88 

02/12/95 Brissette, Arlene Clayton 80 

09/14/95 Brownell. Harold Parker 79 

08/10/95 Bunney, Isabelle Marie 82 

06/25/95 Bums. James G. 64 

09/11/95 Calhoun. Sybil Pearl 95 

05/29/95 Cheever. Eve Ruth 69 

03/07/95 Demeritt. Chester C. 75 

07/1 0/95 Emack, Erma Madalene 91 

02/02/95 Estes. Richard Arthur. Sr. 77 

10/20/95 Proton. Wilfred William 84 

02/10/95 Gagnon. Marie Rose 85 

02/02/95 Gray. Sylvia Martha 85 

06/02/95 Harding. Prederick William 82 

04/05/95 Harrison. James Robert 71 

05/06/95 Hoile. Helen C. 99 

12/18/95 Hussey. John Allen 66 

07/03/95 Johnson. Donald Einar 71 

01/01/95 Joy.EdwigeM. 96 

09/27/95 Kirch. Elsie Mae 64 

01/23/95 Labrie. Ronald Edward 46 

09/05/95 Larkin. Esther Ellen 101 

10/25/95 Leavitt. Nathalie Belcher 79 

12/15/95 Lord, llda Olene 71 

07/05/95 McDuffee. Gerald Eugene 84 

04/29/95 Merrow. Gertrude Bickford 96 

12/05/95 Merrow. Nellie Sands 92 

05/16/95 Nason, Johnnie Willis 73 

12/28/95 O'Neil. Thomas Prancis 79 

09/03/95 Parker. George L 82 

06/30/95 Parker, Lola Elisabeth 94 

08/06/95 Parker. Mary Ann 83 

07/31/95 Peaslee, Dorothy Ellen 90 

07/20/95 Pineo. Margaret Lapthorn 79 

12/07/95 Prindall. Royal D. 90 

09/19/95 Reynolds, Joseph Patrick 57 

04/02/95 Ripley, Lillian G 100 

08/14/95 Sidelmger, Eleanor Stover 81 

09/29/95 Spence, Virginia Edith 77 

10/15/95 Stem, Adam Dearsmith 30 

09/28/95 Sullivan, Margaret C. 89 

04/01/95 Taylor, Janice Appier 85 

03/21/95 Thurston, Lois Eaton 86 



Name of Father/Mother 

John Arata/lsmene Neri 

Joseph William Roy/Edith Alice Vaillancourt 

Frank Rouse/Minnie E. Hale 

Peter Foyder/Mary Clear 

George H. Browne/Virginia Clayton 

David Brownell/Clara Parker 

Peter Nadeau/Con'ine Boisvert 

Frank Burns/Anna Peck 

William McKeen Sanbom/ Etta Mae Wiggin 

Wesley J. Bmce/Bride Murphy 

(Unknown )/(Unknown) 

George K. Gile/Mabel A. Whitcher 

Arthur Estes/Freda Adjutant 

William Froton/Mary Elizabeth Muise 

Napoleon Bouchette/Rose Parent 

Frederick P. Cram/Annie L. Mclntire 

Arthur Harding/Catherine Flynn 

Clarence J. Harrison/Mary Kidd 

Eugene Markwith/Minerva Lee Layton 

Thomas Hussey/Beatrice Evans 

Einar Johnson/Reita Waldron 

Jean Cyr/Octavie Therrien 

Leonard Adkins/Ellie Sanders 

Albert J. Labrie/Faith Cassidy 

William Kohler/Emma Doyen 

Lester H. Belcher/Florence May Davy 

Gerald E. Lord/Damie Spaulding 

Irving E. McDuffee/Minnie E. Templeton 

Roy Bickford/Susan J. Shaw 

Frank Sands/Margaret Calahan 

Willis Linwood Nason/Maude Reed 

William F. O'Neil/Rose Norton 

Leister E. Parker/Irene H. McAllister 

August Schaeffer/Fannie Schmelz 

Patrick Burke/Sarah Connelly 

William Robinson/Nettie Quimby 

Robert B. Innes/Margaret Lapthorn 

Everett Prindal I/Laura Ida (Unknown) 

Thomas Reynolds/Gladys Kelley 

Lemual Rich/Minnie Clark 

Arthur Aaron Black/Ruby Stover 

Philip Davis/Edith (Unknown) 

Morton Stem/Susan Clark 

Frank Regine/Theresa Despino 

Charles Ross Apler/lda Streeper Trayer 

Edwin Eaton/Grace Philbrick 



101 



01/07/95 Tibbetts. Charies Edwin 80 

01/2A/% Trotman, Scott Garrison 26 

03/23/95 Tubman. Lois Wright 67 

10/05/95 Varney, Ernest Raymond 83 

09/05/95 Vendnllo. Margaret E. 91 

05/02/95 Visney. John Victor 89 

11/07/95 Vose, Madeline Dyer 98 

10/03/95 Welch, PaulJoseph 69 

06/06/95 Weston. Edward Everett 87 

05/30/95 White. Elmer Clifford 71 

10/16/95 Wright. Arthur Edward 81 



Archie H. Tibbetts/Abbey Wiggin 
John F. Trotman/Ruth Crowell 
J. Fred Wriaht/Martha Allard 
George E. vamey/Emma Demeritt 
John Murray/Katherine Staplelton 
John Visney/Susanna (Unknown) 
Edwin Haines Vose/lsadore Birsten 
Benjamin Welch/Estella (Unknown) 
Edward Weston/Edith Coleman 
James R. White/Jennie Rowe 
Elwin Wright/Lena Grace Farr 



102 



NOTES 



103 



NOTES 



104 



ASSESSING & SELECTMEN'S OFFICE HOURS 

Mod - Fri 8:00 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

(603)539-4181 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

(603)539-4181 

TOWN CLERK, TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE HOURS 

Mon-Fri 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

(603)539-4183 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT HOURS 

As needed - Answering Machine 

(603)539-1387 

TOWN INCINERATOR 

Mon. - Sat 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

(Permit fee $1 0.00 - Selectmen's Office) 

(603)539-4121 

LIBRARY 

Winter and Summer Hours Vary 

Monday 6:00 P.M. - 8:00 P.M. 

Tuesday & Wednesday 10:00 A.M. - 2:00 P. M. 

Friday & Saturday 10:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M. 

Closed Thursday and Sunday 

(603) 539-6390 

WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENT 

Bookkeeping - 8:00 A.M. - 1 2:00 Noon 

(603)539-7150 

PLANNING BOARD 

1 St Tuesday - 7:00 P.M. — Formal Meeting 

3rd Tuesday - 7:00 P.M. — Informal Meeting 

2nd, 4th, 5th Tuesday — Work Sessions as Needed 

(603)539-4181 

ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

2nd Tuesday - 7:00 P.M. 

(603)539-4181 

CODE ENFORCEMENT OFFICER 

Mon Evenings - 4:00 P.M. - 7:00 P.M. 

(603)539-4181 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

2nd Wednesday - 7:30 P.M. 

(603)539-4181 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE 

Monthly Meetings - Tuesdays 

(603)539-4181 



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